Federal Signal 12 volt Vibratone Model 33

167

Member
Need wiring instructions. 2 wires coming out of the back of horn. Need to know if its hot and ground or hot, hot and grounds to the horn chassis.

Thanks.
 

Skulldigger

Site Guru
If you have a black and white wire, they are positive (b) and ground (w). this is a vibrating diaphragm.

 
OP
OP
167

167

Member
Maybe I'm calling it the wrong thing, but this thing is old. It's not any of their current stuff.

Both wires are black. That's why I was wondering if it ground to the horn itself and the wires just closed a positive circuit like when wiring the horn function on a siren.
 

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Stampeed Valkyrie

Senior Member
Silver Supporter
You would figure if it was AC you would have 3 wires coming off of it..

Zooming in on the tag it reads 12V which I am assuming... DC.
reversing polarity should make the motor spin in a reverse direction.

If the horn is grounded to itself you could get a meter out and test for continuity..
whichever wire shows you a reading is ground.
 
OP
OP
167

167

Member
You would figure if it was AC you would have 3 wires coming off of it..

Zooming in on the tag it reads 12V which I am assuming... DC.
reversing polarity should make the motor spin in a reverse direction.

If the horn is grounded to itself you could get a meter out and test for continuity..
whichever wire shows you a reading is ground.
It is 12volt DC. I'll try what you suggested.

This is a vibrating diaphragm mechanism. No motor.
Know how to wire it?

I tried it last night as 1 hot and 1 ground for a quarter second on a programmer that I have. It sounded , but immediately blew the fuse.
 

Stampeed Valkyrie

Senior Member
Silver Supporter
So like a voice coil on a speaker? I'm not sure how a vibrating diaphragm works.

If its a voice coil you'll need an amp to drive it.. like a siren.

I figured it was a mechanical siren
 

Phillyrube

Senior Member
Older AC used 2 wires. The vibratones were the horns they used to use in school to announce end of periods.
Maybe try 12 volts and then the ultimate smoke test with 115?
 

MtnMan

Senior Member
It is 12volt DC. I'll try what you suggested.


Know how to wire it?

I tried it last night as 1 hot and 1 ground for a quarter second on a programmer that I have. It sounded , but immediately blew the fuse.
 

Stampeed Valkyrie

Senior Member
Silver Supporter
You might want to reach out to Federal on this @167 to confirm if its AC or DC powered.
 

cmb56

Member
@167
What is the name tag saying?
I can see voltage: 12 but not exactly cycles: ? and amps: ?

There is also a sticker that give a hint that the horn is UL-listed.

To me the stamping at the cycles look like AC and the UL sticker tells me that this is a horn for Alternating Current (AC) and not Direct Current (DC).

Michael
 

cmb56

Member
@167
The cycles says 60 that mean that it is 60Hz and that also mean that the horn is AC.
The Voltage is 12V but NOT DC (Direct Current) but AC (Alternating Current) with the frequency 60Hz.
DC can not have any frequency because it is as the name says Direct Current.

You must find a converter for 115VAC to 12VAC that gives out more than 4,5Amps (54Watt).

Michael
 

Stampeed Valkyrie

Senior Member
Silver Supporter
See if you can locate some of the old industrial bell relay systems.. When upgrading old buildings we find them regularly.. most are 24v AC but I have seen some 12 and 14 volts AC.
 
OP
OP
167

167

Member
@167
The cycles says 60 that mean that it is 60Hz and that also mean that the horn is AC.
The Voltage is 12V but NOT DC (Direct Current) but AC (Alternating Current) with the frequency 60Hz.
DC can not have any frequency because it is as the name says Direct Current.

You must find a converter for 115VAC to 12VAC that gives out more than 4,5Amps (54Watt).

Michael
Curses.
 

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