Newer EMS Fly Car for Manhasset-Lakeville F.D., NY

Kirk @ K&D Lighting

Junior Member
Member
May 21, 2010
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Long Island, NY
The Manhasset-Lakeville F.D. on Long Island, NY just put into service a newer EMS Fly Car. It is a former Chief's truck from our fleet and is a 2006 Chevrolet Suburban with an all Whelen LED lighting package. The fly car is available for any EMT/AMT in our department to sign-out and use for any allotted period of time. Photos and video taken by me. ~Kirk


amlfd.smugmug.com_Apparatus_EMS_Fly_Car_8799_87992010_004_970953759_Gbrb6_M.jpg


amlfd.smugmug.com_Apparatus_EMS_Fly_Car_8799_87992010_010_970957037_DveLh_M.jpg


amlfd.smugmug.com_Apparatus_EMS_Fly_Car_8799_87992010_015_970961901_gTJbK_S.jpg
 
Squad-6 said:
What is a "fly car" & why can anyone just take it for a day?

fly cars are 1st response vehicles that r usually tahoes, suburbans, expeditions. it essentially has everything an ambulance has minus the stretcher. Some fire dept.s only do 1st response BLS (and a paid ALS service will transport the pt.), thus the fly-car SUV is EMT staffed and responds to assess & stabilize the pt. (if needed) until ALS arrives, and you'll also often see a lot of fly cars that are ALS (i.e. if a BLS ambulance gets 10-23 on scene 1st and it's a scoop-and-run pt., an ALS flycar can "ALS intercept" them and hop on their BLS rig w/ his lifepack and drug box).


some departments allow qualified members to use sign out their fly cars so that the EMT can respond immediately (as opposed to delayed responses/taking time to respond POV to the station) when the tones drop. (i.e. since i was a crew chief in my EMS squad, i could take one of our tahoes/suburbans out and keep it with me in my free time for however long i signed it out, as long as i stayed within district; i'd serve as 2nd due if the duty crew was out on a call or i'd respond if they needed manpower). it's also nice for the officers to have an idea when there's already coverage and when they need to look 4 someone avail.


looks good kirk!
 
Any EMT or AMT in our fire department can sign-out the fly car any allotted time period. The point behind the fly car is to have a medic on the road responding directly to the scene for the fastest medical response possible. With a trained medic driving the fly car, it allows you to have a driver only to respond in the ambulance to the scene and meet the fly car. It works out very well for us.
 
Is 911 not used there? I don't think I've ever seen a FD vehicle with a 7-digit phone number and no 9-1-1 stickers. Looks like one of those ambulances that do transfers only, no e-calls.
 
gpod said:
Is 911 not used there? I don't think I've ever seen a FD vehicle with a 7-digit phone number and no 9-1-1 stickers. Looks like one of those ambulances that do transfers only, no e-calls.

Many fire department throughout Long Island, NY have their own dispatchers. If you dial 911 in our area, you will be directed to Nassau County FireCom who takes all of the information and forwards it to our own dispatcher. So we receive alarms via our own emergency # as well as from FireCom dispatchers (911). We offer full BLS/ALS services with both of our ambulances.
 
Kirk @ K&D Lighting said:
AMT = Advanced Medical Technician, also means EMT-CC (Critical Care)

I'm with RL1, I've never heard of an AMT. Is that like an Advanced EMT in other states? Or is it closer to a Paramedic? In Indiana we have EMT-B, EMT-BA, EMT-I and EMT-P. The only critial care cert you can get (to my knowledge) here is if you're a medic.
 
WTFD said:
I'm with RL1, I've never heard of an AMT. Is that like an Advanced EMT in other states? Or is it closer to a Paramedic? In Indiana we have EMT-B, EMT-BA, EMT-I and EMT-P. The only critial care cert you can get (to my knowledge) here is if you're a medic.

in new york, there are several levels of EMS that DOH has:


--CFR


--EMT-Basic


--AEMT-I (Intermediate)


--AEMT-CC (critical care)


--AEMT-P (medic)


in my attempt to put it simply, critical cares can essentially do what paramedics can do, but they have to get authorization from an MD in med-control a lot more often than a paramedic does (CC's training is significantly shorter than EMT-P, thus they don't go into the same depth of detail about why go push certain drugs, etc....if they have a critical situation, they often call med-control and the MD will tell them what drugs to push, etc.)
 
Thanks for the info! And back to the original topic... I wish we had a fly car we could sign out at my dept, that would be great for when you're around town to get people on scene quicker!
 
pdk9 said:
in new york, there are several levels of EMS that DOH has:


--CFR


--EMT-Basic


--AEMT-I (Intermediate)


--AEMT-CC (critical care)


--AEMT-P (medic)


in my attempt to put it simply, critical cares can essentially do what paramedics can do, but they have to get authorization from an MD in med-control a lot more often than a paramedic does (CC's training is significantly shorter than EMT-P, thus they don't go into the same depth of detail about why go push certain drugs, etc....if they have a critical situation, they often call med-control and the MD will tell them what drugs to push, etc.)

Ahh. Same as our old Cardiac Tech then.
 
Sweet Set-up! That Freedom is probably my favorite lightbar.
 

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