Old Whelen Power Supplies

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
First thing to try is known working caps. These do have screw terminials...some of 'em, you have to desolder which is a slight PITA.
I know I have CAPs around, I'll give them a swap. They whole thing smells/stinks like a ruptured cap to me but I can find no evidence of one.
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
Here are some spare edge supplies I have, the newer ones are all potted and not very interesting. The oldest one has the outputs on the board, it is double flash. The other non-potted one has an output pigtail and is comet flash. The newest ones are multip-pattern.

PXL_20220501_204113334.MP.jpg

PXL_20220501_204128753.MP.jpgPXL_20220501_204146824.MP.jpg

PXL_20220501_204154615.MP.jpgPXL_20220501_204209071.MP.jpg
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
The one modern potted power supply that stands out to me is the UB412
1651528392497.png
This is the only PS I know of that Whelen made where the controller sends flash port/timing data in real time to the PS. It could be used as a conventional PS with limited patterns - but if you hooked up to the 2-wire RS485 interface and sent the right numbers to it, you could make it flash however you wanted.
I gather this was necessary for the ULTRA bars where three PSs worked together to form a whole-bar pattern.
BL10000s did this before the UB412/ULTRA, but the BL10000 didn't use simple RS485 messaging to do it (instead, direct shift-register low-level electronics were used).
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
The one modern potted power supply that stands out to me is the UB412
View attachment 236528
This is the only PS I know of that Whelen made where the controller sends flash port/timing data in real time to the PS. It could be used as a conventional PS with limited patterns - but if you hooked up to the 2-wire RS485 interface and sent the right numbers to it, you could make it flash however you wanted.
I gather this was necessary for the ULTRA bars where three PSs worked together to form a whole-bar pattern.
BL10000s did this before the UB412/ULTRA, but the BL10000 didn't use simple RS485 messaging to do it (instead, direct shift-register low-level electronics were used).
That is interesting... I forgot it even came from an ultra bar, but it obviously did.PXL_20220501_204249462.MP.jpg
PXL_20220501_204306680.MP.jpg
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
Here's a DOT-94C manufactured around '97 (based on components' date codes). The board itself bears a copyright of 1993!

As you can see, some bozo replaced the original Motorola micro controller with a hacked-in Microchip MCU (PIC16F893) but that might help make a point.

This PS demonstrates the transition from old-school low-level ICs to "intelligent" microcontroller-based power supplies. This opened the door for these devices to interact with a network (i.e. B-LINK) as well as allowed for a variety of flash patterns.

1651577924395.png
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
This came in a set of DOT stuff I bought, it was the only non-working one. The capacitor mounts are broken which isn't common, but I don't think that's why it isn't working. It makes a very fast clicking sound when powered up. It was connected to a pair of micro edges with two linear "corner" tubes in each (4 total). Notice there is no "head select" wire, it is either on or off.

I did get a few 94Cs and a UPS64 double flash and a UPS64C comet flash supply in the lot as well as some misc newer stuff, so it was worth it.

PXL_20220507_212755237.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_212802060.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_212839541.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_212831945.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_212901916.MP.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: RS485

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
This came in a set of DOT stuff I bought, it was the only non-working one. The capacitor mounts are broken which isn't common, but I don't think that's why it isn't working. It makes a very fast clicking sound when powered up. It was connected to a pair of micro edges with two linear "corner" tubes in each (4 total). Notice there is no "head select" wire, it is either on or off.

I did get a few 94Cs and a UPS64 double flash and a UPS64C comet flash supply in the lot as well as some misc newer stuff, so it was worth it.

View attachment 236581

View attachment 236582

View attachment 236584

View attachment 236583

View attachment 236585
Yes, the Austin Model "-RS-" -- it has the same board as Whelen UPS52 but no options are built out (no head selection, no low-power). I think we covered that on PG 1 here.
Can you tell exactly where the clicking sound is coming from from? If its a capacitor, I think it means its arcing across plates inside (really not good). Otherwise, it might be the inverter kicking in but mostly staying off. IIRC, I had one doing this and it was a really bad solder on one of the legs of the power transformer.
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
Yes, the Austin Model "-RS-" -- it has the same board as Whelen UPS52 but no options are built out (no head selection, no low-power). I think we covered that on PG 1 here.
Can you tell exactly where the clicking sound is coming from from? If its a capacitor, I think it means its arcing across plates inside (really not good). Otherwise, it might be the inverter kicking in but mostly staying off. IIRC, I had one doing this and it was a really bad solder on one of the legs of the power transformer.

It is like the one you showed here when you did the comparison to the UPS52 (like you said). The capacitors look like a different brand, but I have noted variation in capacitors within the same model before. The capacitors and transformer look more like your UPS52 than the Austin one in your example, I guess there was a lot of crossover in parts. The clicking doesn't sound like it is coming from the capacitors, although I guess that really doesn't mean it isn't the problem. All the soldered components on this one look questionable in a few spots. This didn't have an easy life when it comes to impact/vibration. When I opened it I was hoping the displaced capacitors were touching something they shouldn't, but that looks fine. I probably won't mess with it much, but I thought the damage to the capacitor "tray" was interesting.

compps.jpg
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
At some point, Whelen seemed to partnered with some capacitor maker(s) where the caps no longer had the microfarads (uF) or voltage printed on them...just a Whelen part number. Prior to that point, it seems like they got caps from whoever had them.
Here's the only example I have where I found "Rubicon" caps in a Whelen PS:
1651968012263.png
 
  • Like
Reactions: JohnMarcson

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
On completely different side of things, I also got these (two complete units because why not), which I don't think I have time to even start looking at right now.



1990amb.JPG

PXL_20220507_232507822.MP.jpgPXL_20220507_232623976.MP.jpg
PXL_20220507_235205882.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_235159496.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_235215316.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_235240176.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_235249221.MP.jpg



PXL_20220507_235509038.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_235541984.MP.jpg

PXL_20220507_235604223.MP.jpg
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
At some point, Whelen seemed to partnered with some capacitor maker(s) where the caps no longer had the microfarads (uF) or voltage printed on them...just a Whelen part number. Prior to that point, it seems like they got caps from whoever had them.
Here's the only example I have where I found "Rubicon" caps in a Whelen PS:
View attachment 236591

That is really interesting, a huge variation in size but not specifications. I should start keeping track of capacitor brands I find in each.
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
On completely different side of things, I also got these (two complete units because why not), which I don't think I have time to even start looking at right now.



View attachment 236590

View attachment 236588View attachment 236589
View attachment 236593

View attachment 236592

View attachment 236594

View attachment 236595

View attachment 236596



View attachment 236597

View attachment 236598

View attachment 236599

The corner of the SYSTEM14 PS board caught my eye as it looked like it has an H11A1 opto-coupler. I happen to have an aircraft PS that had a similar arrangement.
After a little bit of tinkering, I believe both boards share the same design element with respect to synchronization where, if a signal comes in to the opto-coupler, it holds the NE555 timer OFF. Pulling down that signal will cause the first pulse of the double-flash to occur. Pulling the signal back up will cause the second pulse of the double flash to occur, then continue to hold the NE555 OFF.

So I jumpered a signal in from an Arduino board and voila! the Arduino controlled the flash of the aircraft PS.

So if the SYSTEM14's "Master Sequencer" fails, each PS is left to double-flash according to its own NE555 timer (which the brochure describes as "Random").

One thing I don't get is the odd number of heads (9) in the "Secondary" mode. Does the "Master Sequencer" have individual control over each of the two heads within each PS?

In any case, thanks for sharing the SYSTEM14 pics! This is a really intriguing device!

1652097118420.png
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
The corner of the SYSTEM14 PS board caught my eye as it looked like it has an H11A1 opto-coupler. I happen to have an aircraft PS that had a similar arrangement.
After a little bit of tinkering, I believe both boards share the same design element with respect to synchronization where, if a signal comes in to the opto-coupler, it holds the NE555 timer OFF. Pulling down that signal will cause the first pulse of the double-flash to occur. Pulling the signal back up will cause the second pulse of the double flash to occur, then continue to hold the NE555 OFF.

So I jumpered a signal in from an Arduino board and voila! the Arduino controlled the flash of the aircraft PS.

So if the SYSTEM14's "Master Sequencer" fails, each PS is left to double-flash according to its own NE555 timer (which the brochure describes as "Random").

One thing I don't get is the odd number of heads (9) in the "Secondary" mode. Does the "Master Sequencer" have individual control over each of the two heads within each PS?

In any case, thanks for sharing the SYSTEM14 pics! This is a really intriguing device!

View attachment 236638
As mentioned by noting the odd number, secondary mode deactivates the front 2 (or 4 in some systems) grill and intersection lights as well as the single center clear front box light while leaving the 8 corner red box lights and single rear center amber activated. That makes 9. This complies with the somewhat specific KKK standard for lights on ambulances that strobes were failing to meet because of their "paired nature". By design the system flashes the 8 corner box lights against the 6 grill/intersection/clear light(s). That 8 against 6 unbalanced "load" is interesting by itself, although explained by the individual supplies whereas the odd number isn't. I probably have enough strobes to put ends back on the cables and test it out at some point.

You can't see in the pictures but the center clear and rear amber are on the same power supply, that would mean deactivating half of it. The grill lights and intersection lights are on the same two supplies so that makes sense. The "complete" one has some extra components under the "hood" I don't have on the parts one. Connected at the "sequencer end" is an extra board that looks similar to a halogen edge flasher. It appears to be hooked into the sequencer controls. This unit was removed working from a full 14 head setup (8 red corner lights, 4 intersection/grill, 1 rear amber and 1 front clear).


PXL_20220509_192753907.MP.jpg
PXL_20220509_193008519.MP.jpg
PXL_20220509_193724875.MP.jpg

PXL_20220509_193739429.MP.jpg

PXL_20220509_193840039.MP.jpg
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
I got this today (Whelen Model "HD" ca 1970):

1652384506996.png
This has the "AEI/L" board but also a "AEI FF" board. I'm guessing the "FF" means "flip flop" and I've confirmed it does indeed single-flash alternating side-to-side.

Looks like the CAPS bear a date code with the year '69':

1652384706137.png
Not sure exactly how many PSs I have but of those that I do, I only know of two that _don't_ have the trigger circuit combined into the power supply.
I'll have to build out another trigger circuit to be able to demo this PS (and fix the disconnected green wire too, of course).


Kind of related: I got a "Lectric Lites" LL800 ca 1974:
1652385359503.png

The board bears a markings of a company named, "SIMPLEC" :
1652386297997.png
-- they hold this patent:
So I'm guessing LL got their early circuit designs from SIMPLEC...but just a guess.
Later PSs didn't look like this...maybe LL built up their own EE staff? Pls chime in if you know part of this history!
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
Here is my latest acquisition, complete with 1979 paperwork and accessories. Anyone know what they mean by a jumper, i.e. which wires in the plugs?

PXL_20220512_212521974.MP.jpgPXL_20220512_212629464.MP.jpg
PXL_20220512_212613119.MP.jpg
 
Last edited:

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
I got this today (Whelen Model "HD" ca 1970):

View attachment 236674
This has the "AEI/L" board but also a "AEI FF" board. I'm guessing the "FF" means "flip flop" and I've confirmed it does indeed single-flash alternating side-to-side.

Looks like the CAPS bear a date code with the year '69':

View attachment 236675
Not sure exactly how many PSs I have but of those that I do, I only know of two that _don't_ have the trigger circuit combined into the power supply.
I'll have to build out another trigger circuit to be able to demo this PS (and fix the disconnected green wire too, of course).
The lack of a trigger... was that an aircraft thing or just an early strobe thing or both just by the fact that early strobes were for aircraft?
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
Here is my latest acquisition, complete with 1979 paperwork and accessories. Anyone know what they mean by a jumper, i.e. which wires in the plugs?

View attachment 236678View attachment 236680
View attachment 236679

The "jumper" was a white-wire (the only wire in the provided in two AMP connectors wired back-to-back) between the trigger of port #1 to port #2 which had the effect of causing whatever you plugged into ports #3 and/or #4 to flash at ~120 FPM. It basically bridged the triggers of alternating ports.
 

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
The lack of a trigger... was that an aircraft thing or just an early strobe thing or both just by the fact that early strobes were for aircraft?
I don't know! -- You have perhaps the oldest beacon we (I) know about...your earliest "commander" beacon with the AEI/L board. I wouldn't dare ask you to "violate" it...but I venture that if you did/could take some good close-up photos, we might find some extra circuitry between the AEI/L board, and the flash-tube itself.
As I learn more, I'll report more back. It could be that the AEI/L board has a provision for a trigger circuit...but at this point (given the two instances I have) I absolutely don't see it anywhere.
Further...the fact that this _is the same board_ you have in your early commander...tells me at that point in time, Whelen themselves didn't necessarily know what was an "aircraft thing" or otherwise...they were in the throws of figuring that out! Which is why these early boards are so cool! :)
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
The "jumper" was a white-wire (the only wire in the provided in two AMP connectors wired back-to-back) between the trigger of port #1 to port #2 which had the effect of causing whatever you plugged into ports #3 and/or #4 to flash at ~120 FPM. It basically bridged the triggers of alternating ports.
I didn't look closely enough in my excitement of unpacking this power supply (NOS), came with one (and a neat Whelen sticker).

PXL_20220512_233649678.MP.jpgPXL_20220512_233747935.MP.jpg

The Piercer 1 ran on this idea on a 2 head supply.
piercer1.jpg
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
I don't know! -- You have perhaps the oldest beacon we (I) know about...your earliest "commander" beacon with the AEI/L board. I wouldn't dare ask you to "violate" it...but I venture that if you did/could take some good close-up photos, we might find some extra circuitry between the AEI/L board, and the flash-tube itself.
As I learn more, I'll report more back. It could be that the AEI/L board has a provision for a trigger circuit...but at this point (given the two instances I have) I absolutely don't see it anywhere.
Further...the fact that this _is the same board_ you have in your early commander...tells me at that point in time, Whelen themselves didn't necessarily know what was an "aircraft thing" or otherwise...they were in the throws of figuring that out! Which is why these early boards are so cool! :)

I will have to get better pictures of the early Commander. There is a lot of attention paid by Whelen to adapting their rotating prism style beacon from aircraft to ground vehicle, but the transition from strobes seems less well documented. They say they started researching it for the aircraft market in 1963, but the cross over seems more muddy as far as a time frame, and obviously the technology was more complicated.
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
John, what documentation do you have on Whelen's aircraft to automotive transition of the Rota-Beam?
Their site talks about it more, but also every time a catalog mentions their history it is talking about the first rotating motorcycle light etc. I thought I had a small article about the jump to motorcycle lights but I can't find it. They are actually pretty vague in the regards to the aviation to road vehicle transition in all cases, but I felt like the rotabeam going directly from air to ground was more of a direct port and had a little documentation whereas the strobe side they mention it happened but we don't know how they adapted it etc. I will keep digging for the article.

coverinf.jpg
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
Joliet, Illinois The Spectator, November 1, 1956
This is what I was referring to. Thanks.

When it comes to strobes we know that the first beacons looked very similar to aircraft strobes but may have included the addition of a trigger. We don't know if we are right that the aircraft technology was 100% ported over, but I do have some evidence that it was adapted very closely. it looks like the L, K, J, and H remote strobes are pretty much copy overs from the aircraft industry. This style remote strobe appears first in the Darley catalogs along side the other earliest known vehicle strobes and continues on being offered for many years, although becoming less and less a "backbone" product.

Here are my aircraft / runway lights and some info from catalogs about automotive products mirroring them. Also pictured are some bulbs that I have removed from older Whelen and LectricLites beacons.

Early vehicle strobes
cross.JPG

Aircraft/runway lights I have

PXL_20220513_160018815.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160026006.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160149848.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160908359.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160953020.MP.jpg

Bulbs I have pulled from older Whelen beacons
PXL_20220513_160728891.MP.jpg
PXL_20220513_160503451.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160436876.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160400941.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160326903.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_160308824.MP.jpg

Here are some "cross over catalogs" and bulb specs
avaircross3.JPGavaitcross3.JPGavaitcross2.JPGaviationcross.JPG

Bulb reference from 1979 until 1989
tubees.JPGtubes.JPG

1989
1900tubeuni.JPG
 
  • Like
Reactions: RS485

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
This is what I was referring to. Thanks.

When it comes to strobes we know that the first beacons looked very similar to aircraft strobes but may have included the addition of a trigger. We don't know if we are right that the aircraft technology was 100% ported over, but I do have some evidence that it was adapted very closely. it looks like the L, K, J, and H remote strobes are pretty much copy overs from the aircraft industry. This style remote strobe appears first in the Darley catalogs along side the other earliest known vehicle strobes and continues on being offered for many years, although becoming less and less a "backbone" product.

Here are my aircraft / runway lights and some info from catalogs about automotive products mirroring them. Also pictured are some bulbs that I have removed from older Whelen and LectricLites beacons.

Early vehicle strobes
View attachment 236709

Aircraft/runway lights I have

View attachment 236691View attachment 236692View attachment 236693View attachment 236694View attachment 236695

Bulbs I have pulled from older Whelen beacons
View attachment 236701
View attachment 236700View attachment 236699View attachment 236698View attachment 236697View attachment 236696

Here are some "cross over catalogs" and bulb specs
View attachment 236705View attachment 236706View attachment 236707View attachment 236708

Bulb reference from 1979 until 1989
View attachment 236703View attachment 236704

1989
View attachment 236702

Thanks! for all this info, John!

So which Whelen beacon did this tube one come from?
1652469459606.png

This tube doesn't have a "trigger coil". I don't know of any early Whelen flashlamp that didn't have the trigger coil built in (usually in the base like all other tubes you showed).

Note: the trigger circuit and trigger coil work together to make the flash happen. The trigger circuit charges up a small capacitor with ~200V. When a timing pulse comes in, that cap is shorted to ground (via an SCR or thyristor) which induces a charge delivered to the trigger coil. The trigger coil is a "step-up" transformer which induces a high voltage (thousands of volts but very very low amperage) around the outside of the tube to cause the Xenon to be ionize. In an ionized state, the resistance of the Xenon tube is now lower...thus the primary charge stored in the main caps can now rush through the tube to cause the actual flash to occur.

Here are some tubes I have:
1652471152683.png
From left to right, tubes 1,2 and 4 were all recovered from Whelen items I got at some point. These three contain a reference to Sylvania part # "R4321A" -- the big tube in the middle is unrelated -- its just a huge Sylvania flash tube to illustrate why Whelen may have turned to Sylvania for tube sourcing (i.e. Sylvania had a serious presence in the market).
The tube all the way on the right is much like yours, John. It bears the letters, "GTC" but I have not yet been able to identify the manufacturer.

The oldest Lectric Lites LL800 I have is ca. 1974 (mentioned earlier). Here's its tube:
1652472172997.png
It came hand-scratched, "11-74". Also note the tube marking right at the line of the potting, (red dot, same "Gtc" logo).
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
Thanks! for all this info, John!

So which Whelen beacon did this tube one come from?
View attachment 236713

This tube doesn't have a "trigger coil". I don't know of any early Whelen flashlamp that didn't have the trigger coil built in (usually in the base like all other tubes you showed).

Note: the trigger circuit and trigger coil work together to make the flash happen. The trigger circuit charges up a small capacitor with ~200V. When a timing pulse comes in, that cap is shorted to ground (via an SCR or thyristor) which induces a charge delivered to the trigger coil. The trigger coil is a "step-up" transformer which induces a high voltage (thousands of volts but very very low amperage) around the outside of the tube to cause the Xenon to be ionize. In an ionized state, the resistance of the Xenon tube is now lower...thus the primary charge stored in the main caps can now rush through the tube to cause the actual flash to occur.
PXL_20220513_160326903.MP.jpgedwad.JPG
The odd bulb looks like a hazardous location Edwards brand


The odd one came out of a Deitz light, which didn't work with this bulb or a "regular one". I have it in the box I am sending to you. I got a similar Deitz light in the same lot with a "normal bulb" that works fine.

The light that the "triggerless" bulb was in is below.

PXL_20220513_210836934.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_210844558.MP.jpg

PXL_20220513_211005676.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_211024536.MP.jpg

PXL_20220513_211044698.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_211050397.MP.jpg


The one that came with it with a "normal bulb".

PXL_20220513_211326412.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_212053132.MP.jpg
PXL_20220513_211746004.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_211459718.MP.jpg
PXL_20220513_211448211.MP.jpgPXL_20220513_211507330.MP.jpg
 
Last edited:

RS485

Lifetime VIP Donor
Aug 5, 2019
171
Central MA
View attachment 236716

This one without the trigger coil came out of a Whelen 5000 strobe which was sold as "nonoperating". I replaced it with the more standard bulbs pictured and it fired right up. I assume someone used the wrong replacement bulb. I have seen similar bulbs in an early Deitz strobe I think, I could be wrong. Either way despite not functioning I thought it was odd enough to keep.
Thanks, John -- IIRC, I got a Tripp-lite strobe way back in the day and it used this format (trigger coil buried in the PS). I gather this works fine when the tube is physically very near the PS (specifically the trigger circuit). But when the possibility of that distance was larger, it seemed to become standard practice to put the trigger coil either _in_ the tube, or very close nearby within the fixture itself.

I say this with this in mind:
1652476429265.png

This beacon was a strobe made by "Flash Technology" which would typically be found on radio/tv/comm towers. These would typically be some 300 to 600 feet away from the power supply...but the trigger coil itself would be a component of the light fixture itself.
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
Thanks, John -- IIRC, I got a Tripp-lite strobe way back in the day and it used this format (trigger coil buried in the PS). I gather this works fine when the tube is physically very near the PS (specifically the trigger circuit). But when the possibility of that distance was larger, it seemed to become standard practice to put the trigger coil either _in_ the tube, or very close nearby within the fixture itself.

I say this with this in mind:
View attachment 236717

This beacon was a strobe made by "Flash Technology" which would typically be found on radio/tv/comm towers. These would typically be some 300 to 600 feet away from the power supply...but the trigger coil itself would be a component of the light fixture itself.
I went and dug around and revised my statement of where I got the odd bulb... it was out of a Dietz, not sure if it was installed by accident... I detailed it above it looks like an edwards industrial light bulb.

I added a few more mystery supplies to the lot I'm sending you, I'll repack them at work tomorrow.
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Original poster
Administrator
May 7, 2010
9,812
Northwest Ohio
The only pics, info that I have on the 1000. From 1968 and 1969 Darley catalogs. Then the switch to 1200.
Here is a 1970s ad for the glass interior GEN 1 strobe commander
cmnd1970.JPG
 

Attachments

  • Commander 1970.pdf
    3.2 MB · Views: 2
  • Like
Reactions: dmathieu

Staff online

Search for a Member

About us

  • Since 1997, eLightbars has been the premier venue for all things emergency warning equipment. Discussions, classified listings, pictures, videos, chat, & more! We strive to keep our staff members strive to keep the forums organized and clutter-free. All of our offerings are free-of-charge with all costs offset by banner advertising. Premium offerings are available to improve your experience.

User Menu

Secure Browsing

eLightbars.org uses SSL to secure all traffic between our server and your browsing device. All actions and transactions within are secured by Sectigo SSL with high-strength encryption.