Fire Department policy on Photos and social networks

TNFF412N

Member
May 22, 2010
387
San Antonio, Texas
We are currently having issues with some of our members taking pictures at scenes. Structure fires to fatal accidents. At no time have they taken pictures or displayed A patient. But they have taken and displayed the vehicle and given loctations. We do not have a formal policy on this and are looking for one. We are also playing devils advocate, what is the difference from us taking pictures and the media? we are not posting anymore or less info then they do? please way in with what your departments have for a policy.....


thanks
 
May 21, 2010
1,176
NJ & IA
We do not take issue with this as long as it is not medical - which my dept doesn't do. Heck, our 2nd in command has been taking photos for years and still does to this day. it all goes onto the fire company website accessible to all viewers. Photos that are not for the public are posted on our internal website. One way or another, they tend to go up.
 

Zach C.

Member
May 22, 2010
476
Southeast, USA
We also do not have a problem with pictures as long as no patient is in the picture. I take photos from structure fires and mvc's. So does our chief and all the chiefs from depts around us. My cousin is a chief from a dept in the next county. He said they dont either as long as the patient isnt in it. We have had family members from fires and mvc's to come up to the hall and ask for copies and thank us for taking them. The photos go on website and in files for the dept as a reference.


We had a guy that used to be in our dept. He moved to another state and it was found that he was doing alot of arson. Once he was arrested he claimed he started doing it while he was a member with us. The investgators from the other state came down made copies of our reports. He was very happy when he found out we also had pics from the fires.


Zach
 

bigcat

Member
May 20, 2010
641
Hartford County, CT
I've known some guys that posted pictures that were in bad taste. The hammer fell hard and an email was sent out by the chief. It is a small company so it didn't take much to get compliance with the chief's wishes (prior to a policy).


The company went as far as to say that any photo taken while on duty becomes the property of the company and isn't to be used without the permission of the company... which according to an article I read recently (either FireHouse or JEMS, I knew I should have cut it out), the company legally has no right to assume ownership of a photo.


I believe the article was saying your best bet is to write a policy that entails what you don't want to see happening (something along the lines of no pictures of individuals in uniform on social networks). That way if someone violates the policy they can be disciplined.


I know people are proud of their jobs and the work they do. I just don't think they realize that when you post those pictures next to some off duty photos, it may put into question your credibility (yeah, I mean those keg-stand photos ;) ).
 

Stendec

Member
May 21, 2010
816
bigcat said:
I know people are proud of their jobs and the work they do. I just don't think they realize that when you post those pictures next to some off duty photos, it may put into question your credibility (yeah, I mean those keg-stand photos ;) ).

Or worse photos than a kegstand :shock:


This is s huge issue in LE - you'd think we'd be more aware of OPSEC, PERSEC, and the impact it can have on our credibility.


The ownership issue gets tangled up with copyrights, the fact that most photos are digital files and don't really exist, and there aren't any clear answers. If you use a company camera on company time as an agent of the company to shoot photos, they belong to the company. It's a lot less clear when you use personal equipment, and photography is not part of your normal duties. It's already been alluded to, but the photos may have evidentiary value, in which case they belong to the first person to serve you with a subpoena
 

Doug

Member
May 23, 2010
1,151
Maryland
bigcat said:
I've known some guys that posted pictures that were in bad taste. The hammer fell hard and an email was sent out by the chief. It is a small company so it didn't take much to get compliance with the chief's wishes (prior to a policy).

The company went as far as to say that any photo taken while on duty becomes the property of the company and isn't to be used without the permission of the company... which according to an article I read recently (either FireHouse or JEMS, I knew I should have cut it out), the company legally has no right to assume ownership of a photo.


I believe the article was saying your best bet is to write a policy that entails what you don't want to see happening (something along the lines of no pictures of individuals in uniform on social networks). That way if someone violates the policy they can be disciplined.


I know people are proud of their jobs and the work they do. I just don't think they realize that when you post those pictures next to some off duty photos, it may put into question your credibility (yeah, I mean those keg-stand photos ;) ).

My FD's policy (and my personal policy, too) is you can take pics. If you're not claiming FD affiliation, not getting special access, etc - in other words, are playing the part of Joe Blow on the street - the photos are yours. However, if you claim special access, FD affiliation, use FD property, etc., then the FD owns the pics.


I believe it's usually best to plan for events like that and figure out solutions to problems before they arise.


Have a look at some of these Google results.
 

Alovebaby41

Member
May 23, 2010
354
Texas
Our Policy stats that no pictures should be taken at all. Unless for official business. (ie evidence and such). Also no pictures of you in uniform on social media sites and such. The only time that photos be taken of you in uniform is at events and places where the department photographer is at.
 

Doug

Member
May 23, 2010
1,151
Maryland
Alovebaby41 said:
Our Policy stats that no pictures should be taken at all. Unless for official business. (ie evidence and such). Also no pictures of you in uniform on social media sites and such. The only time that photos be taken of you in uniform is at events and places where the department photographer is at.

A slight divergence - what about people wearing FD attire (uniform shirts, sweats, etc., not company or buff clothes) when off duty? Seems that some people (general statement, not singling any particular group out) choose to participate in activities that I, myself, would shy away from when wearing FD attire - bars, adult activities, etc..
 

ParkPiggy

Member
May 21, 2010
667
Northeast Ohio
I'm on 2 PDs, and an FD. ALL prohibit FF/Officers from posting photos on social media sites from events/evidence/crashes/fires. All prohibit wearing of any part of our uniform while consuming alcohol. My full time PD prohibits us from eating in "bar areas" while on duty (you can go to restaurants with a bar, as long as your seated in a separate dining area).
 

Doug

Member
May 23, 2010
1,151
Maryland
TNFF412N said:
do any of you have a copy of your policy? if you dont mind can you email it to me? thanks

Check out the link I provided (Google search results for "fire department" "social media" policies). However, don't be limited just to the public safety arena; some private organizations have created some interesting policies. Some, all, or none may apply to your situation.


Check out http://socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php for different companies and their SM policies.
 

mfaith91

Member
May 23, 2010
166
Kentucky
Wow- I was in the process of posting the same type of request- we've had a similar issue come up.


Mike
 

usdemt

Member
May 21, 2010
195
Vermillion SD
Haha this reminds me of an officer that we had at one time. I wont say what department for obvious reasons. But anyways the sheriff got a call about one of the deputies possibly using marijuana from an officer in New Jersey of all places. So the sheriff UAed all of the officers and sure enough the new guy got busted. Come to find out he had a picture of him with a joint in his mouth in uniform on a social network site. The picture was good enough to read the badge and patch on his shoulder and someone in NJ (probably a friend from the social network site) called the local authorities who then contacted the sheriff.
 

ParkPiggy

Member
May 21, 2010
667
Northeast Ohio
There have been some termination cases in Ohio, that were from posting by Officers on FB. Our union attorney has recommended we go beyond our dept policy, and remove any listing of "law enforcement officer, public safety, cop, etc". Our new little joke, is everyone listing our employer as "Adult Babysitting Services Inc".
 

DLuccia

Member
May 21, 2010
675
Greater Waterbury CT
We don't have a dept policy on photographs however each company has rules on them.


My station/company has no issue on posting pictures on facebook or any forum aslong as they aren't cooyrighted or if its a distasteful picture. Several of my fellow dept members are friends on facebook and we never had issues.


We did however have an issue on the dept level a few years ago with a member of one of the other companies bad mouthing the dept, his stations officers and chief on a fire forum. He was suspended and asked to leave the dept as far as I know.


Only problem I have is when press and buffs show up and take pictures of us on calls without asking. I don't want my picture or face displayed if you didn't ask me. We have had the police help some picture takers leave scenes.
 

ParkPiggy

Member
May 21, 2010
667
Northeast Ohio
Since this is kind of split between photos and conduct with FB, and photos from fire/crash/crime scenes being taken while on duty-


In my amateur, "I only play an attorney on TV" legal opinion; Anyone who is taking crash, fire, or crime scene photos should have polices in place with the member department, if they are in anyway associated with that department. Guidelines that clearly state what type of photos you take, what they can be used for, who "owns" them, etc. Otherwise, when the soft stinky stuff hits the fan, the department, its brass, and the city are all going to be pointing fingers!
 

DaveCN5

Member
May 22, 2010
703
South East Michigan
ParkPiggy said:
Our new little joke, is everyone listing our employer as "Adult Babysitting Services Inc".

Some of our officers are "Advanced Community Garbage Men".


Our department had a designated photographer. They were certified First Responder's etc so that they weren't completely useless to the department if they were the first ones on scene, but they were also trained of what is a good opportunity to photgraph and when they shouldn't. We would never release pictures to the public of anyone goofing off, or if anyone was actively involved at a call without full proper PPE on. This means no one shown wearing flip flops, bathing suit, and a t-shirt operating the ladder truck at a house fire as the truck company is cutting a hole in the roof (it wasn't our department, it was the mutual aid's luckily), etc.


Photos are useful, you just have to use common sense and stop and think: "Is this appropriate for me to post?"
 

mfaith91

Member
May 23, 2010
166
Kentucky
Okay.


I spent ALOT of time on this topic.


First- you will need a Code of Conduct policy.


Second- you will need a "Social Media" Policy.


I finished writing both this morning and got the thumbs up (with minor modiciations) from Brass and Legal.


PM me if you want me to email this to you. It is written to include employees & "members".


Mike
 

Doug

Member
May 23, 2010
1,151
Maryland
DLuccia said:
Only problem I have is when press and buffs show up and take pictures of us on calls without asking. I don't want my picture or face displayed if you didn't ask me.

That's an issue that you, as an individual, should address with the photographers beforehand (when possible). I know of people like that (who don't like to have their pictures taken), and I generally try to keep that in mind when shooting. However, it's not always possible - they may be on the line or on the tools, and if I can, I'm going to get those shots - but I may keep them quiet, or just give them to the people in the shot.


On the legalese side of things, there is no reasonable expectation of privacy when you're in public.
 

Grotonems5

Member
Jun 1, 2010
933
Groton, Vermont
Well, these days before any action you really must ask yourself two questions:


Would I want this on Facebook?


Would I want this on Youtube?


Because you never know who has a camera and where they are! Be it the media, some random photographer, your buddies, or your stalker! :lol:


There was a county fair close by recently that had Fire/EMS games we participated in. I knew people had cameras, but did not know that the next day I would be on Youtube and Facebook! No one got my permission, but I was in public.


Really if you think about it, when you are in public it's wide open, people can see you in public, people can take pictures in public, and I may be wrong, but I don't think they need your permission. What is the difference between people seeing you in public (the norm) and seeing you in public on Facebook? Just my thoughts.. :idea:


None of the services I am with have policies on photos and social networks. We do have policies that state you can not buy alchohol, go to strip clubs, etc. while wearing any company logo'd attire.
 

mfaith91

Member
May 23, 2010
166
Kentucky
I'm going to cut and paste what I put togethor for us.... this post will be code of conduct- which you really need to have before you have a social media policy. This basically says this is how we think you should act...

SECTION 3-0 CODE OF CONDUCT

PURPOSE:


The purpose of this policy is to outline the Code of Conduct that the <INSERT YOUR NAME> District, its Board of Trustees, Employees and/or Members shall adhere to.


1. As a basic condition of employment, all employee/members have an obligation to conduct their official duties in a manner that serves the public interest, upholds the public trust, and protects the District's resources. It shall be the policy of the <INSERT YOUR NAME> Protection District to ensure that employee/member(s) perform the duties delegated to them in the manner prescribed by law, ordinance, or by the rules and regulations contained in District SOPs. To this end, all employee/member(s) have the responsibility to govern themselves and their co-workers by the following:


A. Demonstrate honesty, integrity, and ethical behavior in the conducting of all District business.


B. Perform their duties to the very best of their abilities and in a manner that is efficient, cost-effective, and meets the needs of the public.


C. Every fire District employee/member is required to maintain a working knowledge of State Law, City Ordinance, rules, regulations, and/or directives of the Fire District. In the event of improper actions, it will be presumed that the individual was familiar with the law or directive in question.


1) Obedience to laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, directives and orders.


a. All fire District employee/members shall obey all laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, and directives of the District.


b. All fire District employee/members shall perform their duties as required or directed by laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, directives or by order of a supervisor.


c. All lawful duties required by competent authority shall be performed as directed, notwithstanding the general assignment of duties and responsibilities.


d. Employee/members shall not publicly criticize instructions or orders they have received.


e. Supervisors shall not knowingly issue an order that is in violation of any law, ordinance, rule, regulation, or District directive.


f. Employee/members who are given orders they feel to be unjust or contrary to District directives shall first advise the supervisor that the order may be unjust or contrary to District directives. If the order is not withdrawn, the employee/member will comply with the order to the best of their ability and then may appeal the order as indicated in paragraph j, below.


g. Obedience to an unlawful order is never a defense for an unlawful action; therefore, no employee/member is required to obey any order which is contrary to Federal, State, or local Law/ordinance. Responsibility for refusal to obey the order rests with the employee/member, who shall be strictly required to justify their action(s).


h. Upon receipt of an order conflicting with any previous order(s) or instructions, the employee/member affected will advise the person issuing the order of this fact. Responsibility for countermanding the original instruction then rests with the individual issuing the second order. If so directed, the latter command shall be obeyed first. Orders will be countermanded or conflicting orders will be issued only when reasonably necessary for the good of the District.


i. Orders from a supervisor will be reasonable and in a clear and understandable language and must pertain to District business.


j. An employee/member receiving an unjust or improper order shall, at first opportunity, report the details in writing to a Chief of the District through the chain of command. This report shall contain the facts of the incident, and actions taken. The Chief of the District or his designee may conduct additional District investigation(s) regarding the order given.


k. Failure or deliberate refusal of any employee/member to obey lawful orders given by a supervisor shall be deemed insubordination.


l. Employee/members shall not deride a supervisor’s order, whether in or out of their presence.


D. Ensure that personal interests do not come in conflict with official duties and avoid both actual conflicts of interest and the appearance of conflicts of interest when dealing with vendors, customers, and other individuals doing business or seeking to do business with the District.


1) Except as may be specifically authorized by the District Fire Chief or his designee, for use in a special function or unit within the District; employee/members shall not solicit any gift, gratuity, loan, or fee from the public where there is any direct or indirect relationship between such solicitation and their obligations to provide prompt and fair service by the District.


2) Except as may be specifically authorized by the District Fire Chief or his designee; employee/members shall not accept either directly or indirectly any gift, gratuity, loan, fee, or other things of value arising from or offered because of any Fire District activity connected with the employee/member.


3) Employee/members shall not accept any gift, gratuity, loan, fee or other things of value, the acceptance of which might tend to influence directly or indirectly the actions of the employee/member in any matter of Fire District business, or in which might tend to cast an adverse reflection on the District.


4) Except as may be specifically authorized by the District Fire Chief or his designee; employee/members shall not accept any gift, gratuity, or reward in money or other consideration for services rendered in the line of duty from any person, business, or agency in the community.


5) Employee/members shall not solicit any gift, gratuity, loan or fee from the public for any other person where there is any direct or indirect relationship between such solicitation and their District obligations.


E. Ensure that all District resources, including funds, equipment, vehicles, and other property, are used in strict compliance with District policies and solely for the benefit of the District.


1) The distribution or posting of written or printed District matters in public access shall be by approval of the District Fire Chief or his designee.


2) A supervisor must approve all material posted within the Fire District with the exception of the bulletin board at Fire Station One.


3) Posted material will not be marked on or defaced, with the exception of a date, draft, or other District stamp.


4) Employee/members shall not knowingly falsify an official report or knowingly enter or cause to be entered any inaccurate, false, or improper information on the books, records, or registers of the District.


F. Conduct all dealings with the public, employee/member(s), and other organizations in a manner that presents a courteous, professional, and service-oriented image of the District.


G. Treat the public and District employee/member(s) fairly and equitably.


1) Employee/members shall treat the public, District personnel, and the employee/members of other organizations fairly and equitably, without regard to age, color, disability, ethnicity, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or any other factor unrelated to the District’s business.


2) Employee/members shall treat supervisors, peers, and subordinate employee/members with respect.


3) When on duty, uniformed personnel shall be referred to by their rank.


4) Employee/members shall not use coarse, profane, or insolent language toward other District employee/members or the public.


5) Employee/members will conduct themselves in such a manner so as not to bring discredit upon themselves or the District.


H. Avoid any behavior that could fall under the definition of misconduct as outlined by the Executive Branch Code of Ethics under KRS Chapter 11A.


I. Prohibited activities/conditions while on duty:


1) Purchasing, consuming, or being under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance.


2) Bringing into or onto Fire District property or consuming in or on Fire District property, any intoxicating alcohol or controlled substance.


3) Using prescribed medication that would adversely affect body motor movements, reaction time or judgment.


4) Use of tobacco products are prohibited when acting in an official capacity, in direct contact or view of the public.


5) Being unavailable to respond to calls without reason or permission.


6) Failing to turn in or complete District reports when required.


7) Leaving their assigned duty station without reason or permission from their supervisor.


8) Reporting late for duty, unless authorized by their supervisor.


J. Security


1) Employee/members shall not enter any office, desk, locker, or room without the authority from the occupant or the District Fire Chief or his designee.


2) Employee/members shall not discuss any incident with non-District personnel without supervisory approval and then only with that person having a right or a need to know.


3) Employee/members shall not discuss any proposed plan, procedure or project with unauthorized personnel without supervisory approval.


4) Fire employee/members who have information regarding an incident that was responded to may discuss only the portions that are not governed by confidentiality laws. Those portions covered by confidentiality may be discussed only with supervisor approval and only with those with a right or need to know.


5) Employee/members shall not give out other employee/member’s telephone number(s) or address to the general public. The District Fire Chief or designee may release this information to other agencies for official purposes only.


6) Employee/members shall not remove District files (paper or electronic) from District premises unless authorized by a supervisor or by court order.


K. Report for duty at the appointed time and place fully equipped, fit, and able to perform assignments.


L. Uniforms, equipment, and personal appearance.


1) Uniformed employee/members of the District shall maintain their regulation uniforms in good order.


2) All articles of the uniform shall conform to the District’s uniform regulations.


3) Uniformed personnel will comply with directives governing dress and equipment.


4) Civilian clothes may be worn if authorized by the District Fire Chief or his designee..


5) Uniforms shall be kept neat, clean, and well pressed.


6) While wearing the uniform, employee/members shall maintain a military bearing.


7) Employee/members shall not wear uniforms, shirts, hats, jackets, or other paraphernalia while under suspension.


7) Former employee/members shall not wear uniforms, shirts, hats, jackets, or other paraphernalia without the express permission from the District Fire Chief or his designee.


8) Uniforms will be disposed of through a District process, as approved by the District Fire Chief or his designee.


M. Minor Infractions


1) Employee/members who violate infractions listed in “3” (below) may be recommended for disciplinary action. These infractions do not require a complaint register entry or a subsequent detailed investigation, unless requested by the District Fire Chief.


2) Any supervisor may impose immediate corrective measures. When repeated violations occur, an internal investigation may be initiated.


3) The infractions covered in this provision include, but are not limited to, the following:


a) Tardiness in reporting for duty.


B) Insubordination to a superior.


c) Failure to shave or maintain a proper haircut.


d) Failure to keep uniforms clean, pressed, and repaired.


e) Failure to wear proper badges, nameplates, shoulder patches or other insignia.


f) Failure to keep clothing properly buttoned.


g) Failure to keep shoes/boots clean and in good repair.


h) Failure to wear and maintain personal protective equipment.


i) Failure to provide prompt and courteous service.


j) Taking excessive time off while on duty.


k) Failure to remain in assigned work area unless properly relieved or authorized to leave by a supervisor.


m) Reporting unfit for duty for reasons that would justify action under provisions of this order.


2. Officers and supervisors shall set an example for other members and have a responsibility to ensure that their activities and decisions pertaining to community services, personnel actions, and the management of public funds are consistent with the District's policies and practices.
 

mfaith91

Member
May 23, 2010
166
Kentucky
SECTION 15-5 SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY

PURPOSE:


Social media and networking sites, such as Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter have become an integral part of everyday life for millions of people around the world. Social media are powerful communications tools that have a significant impact on organizational and professional reputations. Because they blur the lines between personal voice and institutional voice, the <INSERT YOUR NAME HERE> District has crafted the following policy to help clarify how best to enhance and protect personal and professional reputations when participating in social media.


The U.S. Government defines social media and “Web 2.0” as umbrella terms that define the various activities that integrate technology, social interaction, and content creation. Through social media, individuals or collaborations of individuals can create web content, organize content, edit or comment on content, combine content, and share content. Social media and Web 2.0 uses many technologies and forms, including RSS and other syndicated web feeds, blogs, wikis, photo–sharing, video–sharing, podcast, social bookmarking, mashups, widgets, virtual worlds, micro–blogs, and more. Not all forms of social media may be appropriate for use by District employee/members. Both in professional and personal roles, District employee/members need to follow the same behavioral standards online as they would in real life. The same laws, professional expectations, and guidelines for interacting with the fellow employee/members, public, media, and other agencies apply online as in the real world. Employee/members are liable for anything they post to social media sites.


1. POLICIES FOR ALL SOCIAL MEDIA SITES, INCLUDING PERSONAL SITES


A. Protect confidential and proprietary information.


1. Do not post confidential or proprietary information about the <INSERT YOUR NAME HERE> District, employee/members, patients, or taxpayers. Employees must still follow the applicable federal requirements such as HIPPA. Adhere to all applicable District privacy and confidentiality policies. Employee/members who share confidential information do so at the risk of disciplinary action or immediate termination.


B. Respect copyright and fair use.


1. When posting, be mindful of the copyright and intellectual property rights of others and of the District.


2. For guidance, consult the Guidelines for Copyright Compliance.


C. Endorsements


1. Do not use the <INSERT YOUR NAME HERE> District logo or any other District images or iconography on personal social media sites.


2. Do not use <INSERT YOUR NAME HERE> District’s name to promote a product, cause, or political party or candidate.


D. Respect District time and property.


1. District computers and time on the job are reserved for District-related business as approved by supervisors and in accordance with the District Information Technology Policy (3-8).


E. Obey the Terms of Service of any social media platform employed.


F. All social media postings must conform to the District Code of Conduct Policy (3-0).


2. POSTING ON BEHALF OF THE FIRE DISTRICT


A. This section applies to those posting on behalf the Fire District, though the guidelines may be helpful for anyone posting on social media in any capacity.


1. Think twice before posting: Privacy does not exist in the world of social media. Consider what could happen if a post becomes widely known and how that may reflect both on the poster and the District. Search engines can turn up posts years after they are created, and comments can be forwarded or copied.


2. If you wouldn’t say it at a conference or to a member of the media, consider whether you should post it online.


3. If you are unsure about posting something or responding to a comment, ask your supervisor.


B. Strive for accuracy.


1. Get the facts straight before posting them on social media.


2. Review content for grammatical and spelling errors. This is especially important if posting on behalf of the District in any capacity. (See “District social media” below.)


C. Be respectful.


1. Understand that content contributed to a social media site could encourage comments or discussion of opposing ideas. Responses should be considered carefully in light of how they would reflect on the poster and/or the District and its voice.


D. Remember your audience.


1. Be aware that a presence in the social media world is or easily can be made available to the public at large. This includes prospective employee/members, current employee/members, current employers and colleagues, and peers. Consider this before publishing to ensure the post will not alienate, harm, or provoke any of these groups.


E. On personal sites, identify your views as your own.


1. If you identify yourself as a <INSERT YOUR NAME HERE> District employee/member online, it should be clear that the views expressed are not necessarily those of the Fire District.


F. Photography


1. Photographs posted on social media sites easily can be appropriated by visitors. Consider adding a watermark and/or posting images at 72 dpi and approximately 800x600 resolution to protect your intellectual property. Images at that size are sufficient for viewing on the Web, but not suitable for printing.


2. Without express written consent from the District Fire Chief or his designee, at no time should photographs be posted on social media sites that:


1. Identify a patient without his/her express written consent AND written consent by the District Fire Chief or his designee.


2. Would not be generally accessible, viewable, or able to be obtained by a member of the general public or media.


3. An investigation is currently ongoing that could be impeded by the posting of such photographs.


3. DISTRICT SOCIAL MEDIA


A. If you post on behalf of the Fire District, the following policies must be adhered to in addition to all policies and best practices listed above:


1. Notify the District Fire Chief or his designee. You must obtain written approval from the District Fire Chief or his designee.


2. All District pages must have a full-time appointed employee/member who is identified as being responsible for content. Ideally, this should be a supervisor.


1. If you are representing the <INSERT YOUR NAME HERE> District when posting on a social media platform, you must acknowledge who you are.


2. Have a plan: Approved personnel should consider their messages, audiences, and goals, as well as a strategy for keeping information on social media sites up-to-date. Your supervisor can assist and advise you with your social media planning.


3. Link back to the District: Whenever possible, link back to the Fire District Web site. Ideally, posts should be very brief, redirecting a visitor to content that resides within the Fire District Website when applicable. When posting a news article, it is important to link to the news article, and provide appropriate credit.


4. Protect the District voice.


1. Posts on social media sites should protect the District’s voice by remaining professional in tone and in good taste.


2. No individual employee/member should construe its social media site as representing the District as a whole. Consider this when naming pages or accounts, selecting a profile picture or icon, and selecting content to post.
 

Forum Statistics

Threads
54,293
Messages
451,193
Members
19,268
Latest member
derDeitsch

About Us

  • Since 1997, eLightbars has been the premier venue for all things emergency warning equipment. Discussions, classified listings, pictures, videos, chat, & more! Our staff members strive to keep the forums organized and clutter-free. All of our offerings are free-of-charge with all costs offset by banner advertising. Premium offerings are available to improve your experience.

User Menu

Secure Browsing & Transactions

eLightbars.org uses SSL to secure all traffic between our server and your browsing device. All browsing and transactions within are secured by an SSL Certificate with high-strength encryption.