Kent's Siren Repair Shop

tsquale

Site Minion
Platinum Supporter
@MtnMan I have my GE that we discussed via email on its way to you via USPS. Finger's crossed it isn't too big of a headache for you to get up and running
 

Crownfire

Member
Kent, I sent you a GE Powercall and a Federal Director in a large flat rate box a couple of weeks ago. Been trying to reach you by email. Did the sirens arrive OK.
Thanks
Don Jarvis
 
OP
OP
MtnMan

MtnMan

Senior Member
Kent, I sent you a GE Powercall and a Federal Director in a large flat rate box a couple of weeks ago. Been trying to reach you by email. Did the sirens arrive OK.
Thanks
Don Jarvis
Hi Don. I replied by email on Oct 24. Your sirens are here and they’ll be next on the repair bench. Thanks for your business!
 

Nolines

Silver Supporter
im Betting his nickname is Clark..... a Hes Earned the Title of Superman with his repair jobs!
 

8E PPD

New Member
Hi MtnMan. I have a GE Powercall siren circa 1980. When it's turned on, you can barely get a tone from the speaker. You can hear it, but it's only a whisper. I would like to get you to look at it. I have it attached to a 24 volt system on an 85 AMG 5 ton truck that my organization uses for parades. It worked fine up until a couple months ago. Can you contact me at fmb2675@comcast.net?
 

Safetyman

Established Member
Hi Kent ,
Wondering if you repair Heathkit sirens. I have a Heath /Zenith WD-5130. The yelp settings sounds like a GE Power call and the pitch adjustment is not working. I have a copy of the manual with schematic if you need.
Thanks, Bill
 

Usmc69187

New Member
Kent's (MtnMan's) Siren Repair Shop is open for business!

Got a croaking, squawking, buzzing, fuse-blowing, or just plain dead siren? Want to
hear it wail and yelp again in all its full-power glory?

I've been doing repair and restoration of electronic sirens for ELB members by request, and it seems like time to offer my services more widely. I have experience working on many current and vintage sirens, including:

  • Carson SA, SC series
  • Code 3 V-Con, MasterCom, Undercover
  • Federal Signal PA 15, PA 20, PA 150, PA 200, PA 300, e-Q2B
  • Galls branded sirens
  • North American Signal Siren Master
  • Scientific Protoypes Mark series
  • Star SVP SS series
  • Unitrol 80K, Omega, Touchmaster, Touchmaster Delta
  • Whelen 295, Alpha
The most common component failures encountered on electronic sirens are output transistors (no sound at all), control switches (some modes don't work), and PA mic wiring and switches (no PA or scratchy sound). Older analog sirens are also prone to out-of-spec capacitors, producing tones that just don't sound right.

All of these issues, and more, can be fixed. I offer component-level troubleshooting, and I have sourced replacements for many discontinued and hard-to-find parts, including Germanium power transistors, mics, knobs, switches, fuse holders, connectors and wiring harnesses. Defective output transistors will be replaced with gain-matched pairs, which is important for long-term durability.


Basic repairs start at $60 flat rate, plus actual cost of parts and return shipping. Any additional costs are subject to the customer's approval. If my evaluation indicates that repairs are not feasible, I can return the unit as-is (customer pays return shipping), or I may be able to make a cash offer for parts value.

If you're interested in services, please PM me with details of your siren and its condition for an up-front estimate and further details.

Thanks!
Kent
Kent's (MtnMan's) Siren Repair Shop is open for business!

Got a croaking, squawking, buzzing, fuse-blowing, or just plain dead siren? Want to
hear it wail and yelp again in all its full-power glory?

I've been doing repair and restoration of electronic sirens for ELB members by request, and it seems like time to offer my services more widely. I have experience working on many current and vintage sirens, including:

  • Carson SA, SC series
  • Code 3 V-Con, MasterCom, Undercover
  • Federal Signal PA 15, PA 20, PA 150, PA 200, PA 300, e-Q2B
  • Galls branded sirens
  • North American Signal Siren Master
  • Scientific Protoypes Mark series
  • Star SVP SS series
  • Unitrol 80K, Omega, Touchmaster, Touchmaster Delta
  • Whelen 295, Alpha
The most common component failures encountered on electronic sirens are output transistors (no sound at all), control switches (some modes don't work), and PA mic wiring and switches (no PA or scratchy sound). Older analog sirens are also prone to out-of-spec capacitors, producing tones that just don't sound right.

All of these issues, and more, can be fixed. I offer component-level troubleshooting, and I have sourced replacements for many discontinued and hard-to-find parts, including Germanium power transistors, mics, knobs, switches, fuse holders, connectors and wiring harnesses. Defective output transistors will be replaced with gain-matched pairs, which is important for long-term durability.


Basic repairs start at $60 flat rate, plus actual cost of parts and return shipping. Any additional costs are subject to the customer's approval. If my evaluation indicates that repairs are not feasible, I can return the unit as-is (customer pays return shipping), or I may be able to make a cash offer for parts value.

If you're interested in services, please PM me with details of your siren and its condition for an up-front estimate and further details.

Thanks!
Kent
hey, i have a few NYPD Mark 7 sirens that need various repairs. Im hoping you'll be able to help. Hope to hear back from you.
 

Safetyman

Established Member
HI,
My experience with Kent has been very good . Kent has repaired for me a FS PA15,. PA150, PA200 and his latest repair for me on a Unitrol Touchmaster D. Kent apparently works several jobs in addition to siren repair. My advise is to be patient. He does good work is usually has a bench full.
Bill
 

Usmc69187

New Member
HI,
My experience with Kent has been very good . Kent has repaired for me a FS PA15,. PA150, PA200 and his latest repair for me on a Unitrol Touchmaster D. Kent apparently works several jobs in addition to siren repair. My advise is to be patient. He does good work is usually has a bench full.
Bill
Do you have a phone number for him
 

ProPatriaNeverPassAFault

Silver Supporter
Hi Kent,

I have a Japanese Clarion AA-227A from 1981 that's completely dead. Single tone (simulated mechanical) and the circuitry seems relatively simple. Tricky enough siren to find in Japan, owing to the introduction of the AA-228G a year or so later. Exact same siren, except with a ground cable instead if ground screws on the unit itself.

I've attached photos of the circuitry, including some of a capacitor that's bulging a bit. Please PM me at your earliest convenience. It'd be great to get this little beaut going again!

Thanks!

218510
218513

218512
218514
218515
218516
218517
218518
218520
 

Attachments

Chiefs Chrysler Ñewport

Registered Member
Here's an update on some recent repair work:

I'd like to thank two members for entrusting me with a pair of very uncommon and interesting sirens to repair, giving me a nostalgic blast from the past, and for their patience when the projects turned out to be more extensive than expected.

Tony (tsquale) sent me his beautiful Signal Stat Mark VII (http://elightbars.org/forums/threads/signal-stat-stat-vii-siren.76001/). I have an NYPD spec Mark VII, but I've never seen the full-featured version, with the modified tone switch.

The neat thing about this siren is that it's all off-the-shelf discrete logic and analog components, circa 1980, which is what I learned on as a teenager. You could have walked into any Radio Shack back then and bought almost every part to build this siren (and at checkout time, the sales guy would have tried to upsell you a CB, instead of a cell phone).

I had a scan of the original service manual to work from, but the details of the circuit diagram were blurry and there were some undocumented revisions, so I ended up redrawing the entire schematic (I'll contribute it to the old manuals thread). The Mark VII has a complicated and rather overprotective protection circuit, which was shutting down the tone and output sections. I located the fault, replaced a switching transistor and flip-flop IC, and the siren was back to perfect working order, complete with the funky Mod tones. With Tony's approval, I also did the (easily reversible) modification for the NYPD-style momentary yelp that every New Yorker from the 1970s - 1980s remembers. Check his updated thread for a video of the final result.

Turning back the retro dial a few more notches was the Federal Signal PA-1 received from another member. That's right, not a PA-10, or a PA-5... a PA-ONE. The Original Federal Electronic Siren, from around 1952.

This siren was a real time capsule. The circuitry is all transistorized, which was advanced for the time, but the construction is hand-wired, point-to-point, a technique going back to the early days of tube equipment.

I didn't have any information at all on the circuitry, but fortunately it was basic enough that I was able to trace it out and draft a diagram (to be posted as well). As received, the siren just produced a feeble, monotone squeak. The basic fix was predictable: replacing some dried-out electrolytic capacitors in the oscillator section, which restored the original, rich wail tone.

The siren also showed evidence of some more-expedient-than-expert repair work over the decades (remember, this piece dates to the era when every town had a local radio repair shop). A power resistor had been replaced with a kludged substitute and the output transistors were a mix of mismatched components. I found some NOS transistors on eBay, returned everything to spec, and was very pleased to hear the old siren putting out a solid 50 Watts.

To the member whose PA-15 is on my bench right now, I promise I haven't forgotten! It will be receiving a selector switch transplant first thing next week.

Keep those old sirens coming!
We often had our sirens repaired locally. Usually the power transistors got changed. Sometimes we had them tweaked a bit without the bosses knowing...
 
Hi Kent,

My name is Jacob and I recently bought a Federal Signal PA-15A Series 1E from a buddy. The siren has a few issues. It powers on/off fine and the manual wail seems to work fine but the wail and yelp tones and positions are messed up. Both tones do not cycle properly or at all sometimes and it makes weird sounds and pitches in both positions as well as that scratchy sound when you turn the knob to any position. I was curious as to how much it would cost to repair this siren. Mu buddy also has an old Trippe-Lite Electro-Sonic siren that wont do anything the fuse seems in tact but it wont power on. I dont have any pictures of it on hand but its sentimental to him because it was his grandfathers, who was the Assistant police chief in our city back in the 60s and 70s and the siren came out of his car when he retired. Anyway im hoping you can fix my PA-15A because its in good shape and I would love to have it working like it should.

Thanks,
Jacob


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