Mexican Federal Police VS Mexican State Police

Station 3

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May 21, 2010
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Edinburg Texas
Damn u gotta see this it was a Mexican Stand off litterally i know its in spanish but all you gotta do is watch the video it explains itself. There are like 40 officers aiming there guns at each other and trying to arrest each other because they are accusing each other of being corrupt. :shock: :eek: :eek: :shock: :eek: :shock:


WOW


Video


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eImimWc ... re=related
 
WOW is stinking right! That's so insane :shock:.
 
Station 3 said:
There are like 40 officers aiming there guns at each other and trying to arrest each other because they are accusing each other of being corrupt.

I think you've probably got it wrong - they are probably fighting about who is MORE corrupt, or which group is entitled to which shakedown territory, or who gets which percentage.


I'm sure that in a country of Mexico's size that there are honest, decent hardworking coppers out their doing their job upholding the law. There has to be 5 or 6 of them.


I shouldn't talk, I haven't been to Mexico for 10 years. My goal is to stretch that to forty.
 
ParkPiggy said:
All those cops, and they can't get a handle on the cartels?

In fairness to Mex cops, that's about the same as saying "All those soldiers and they can't get a handle on the Taliban?' The type of conflict is largely the same, right down to the drug money. And the typical US or coalition First World soldier is definitely better paid than the average Mex cop, most likely better trained, and definitely doesn't have a chain of command that may be corrupt, or dead.
 
My older brother, who is really big in to languages (especially Spanish) gathered this much from it. He says, "Supposedly the girlfriend (also a cop) of a drug traffic leader was arrested by one of the State police forces. I think, the girlfriend was a cop of one state, was arrested in the other state, and that caused a protest that blocked a major roadway and brought on the Federal police force"
 
So, here's the real question . . . who won?!
 
IMHO, Mexico is a lost cause. The cartels run the entire country. Nearly all the state police are corrupt. I heard a phrase, in spanish, but I can't remember it. It equates to "$$ or bullet"... take the cartel's money and look the other way, or take a bullet. Obviously, you know what choice most made.


To me, it looked like the federals were trying to take the state into custody. Maybe a turn to try and re-gain some control?


About the only ones you could halfway trust is the mexican army. But, even that's 'halfway...'
 
FireEMSPolice said:
My older brother, who is really big in to languages (especially Spanish) gathered this much from it. He says, "Supposedly the girlfriend (also a cop) of a drug traffic leader was arrested by one of the State police forces. I think, the girlfriend was a cop of one state, was arrested in the other state, and that caused a protest that blocked a major roadway and brought on the Federal police force"

Yup, if you can understand Spanish, you'll see it all started with a girl. Go figure. :lol:
 
Yup well in the end the Federal Police won since they had more back up.
 
Rofocowboy84 said:
LOL!! And yet Obama wants to let them run freely into our country? Smart...


I guess somebody forgot the Alamo? :shock:


:lol:
 
Stendec said:
I think you've probably got it wrong - they are probably fighting about who is MORE corrupt, or which group is entitled to which shakedown territory, or who gets which percentage.


I'm sure that in a country of Mexico's size that there are honest, decent hardworking coppers out their doing their job upholding the law. There has to be 5 or 6 of them.


I shouldn't talk, I haven't been to Mexico for 10 years. My goal is to stretch that to forty.

Quien tiene la plaza?


Historically, the military and police commanders (and their political masters) have controlled the smuggling corridors. The mid-level narco-trafficantes would pay los comandantes for 'la plaza'. The highest public offices would be corrupted by the Mexican Drug Trafficking Organization (MDTO) jefes (Beltran-Levyas, Chapo Guzman, etc). In turn, the national political leaders would move troops loyal to them into the area. The state and local officials would try to get their cut, but many of the mid level trafficantes are ruthless or refuse to pay. Hence the attacks on the policia by the cartels.


La mordida (the bite...aka bribe) is not culturally taboo in Mexico. It is the cost of doing business. Applying US standards to that behavior is seen by Mexicans (and many from central america) as foolish. Years ago talking with a local police officer I found out that they worked 12 hour shifts, 14 days on, one day off and made $50 per week. They had to buy their own uniforms and their own bullets. Looking at the video, the gun being held to the one officer's head is a Beretta. It would not surprise me if it was one of the former INS Beretta 96s. Apparently many of our weapons are given to Mexico as a part of our assistance in the 'war on drugs'.


Non-corrupt officers are typically killed by their counterparts or by the MDTOs within a short amount of time.
 
EVModules said:
Yow! I'm gonna call my legislators to put more $$$ on the border!

Border violence can and will spread into the US. On Tuesday a man who was suspected of being a drug smuggler/scout was shot and killed in Casa Grande, AZ http://www.kold.com/Global/story.asp?S=13393217


The Mexican prison gang "Mexican Mafia" or "La Eme" is responsible for a lot of the distribution and enforcement within the US. As gang members go back to the 'outside', they get involved with their various street gangs to continue that enterprise. It is a unique operation in that La Eme will take non-Mexican latinos under their protection in prison with the understanding of payback on the outside.


South of the border violence is being influenced by jihadists (there is a radical Muslim element in Mexico and Central America). Beheadings and VBIEDs were unknown until a couple of years ago. Now they have become 'tools of the trade' for narco-terrorists. It used to be that people just 'disappeared' (many times as 'guiso' or stew... bodies stuffed into a 55 gallon barrel with lye to emulsify them, leaving only bones and a fatty residue). Now their tortured and mutilated bodies are left as a message for others.


If the cartels every set aside their machismo long enough to band together to overthrow the Mexican government, they will be able to easily accomplish that goal. The chaos that will result will create a national security issue on the southern border that few have ever considered. The cartels would then start fighting each other anew and the bloodshed would be incredible.
 
EVModules said:
Yow! I'm gonna call my legislators to put more $$$ on the border!

Oh yeah, send $$. I need one of these (Ford Raptor). This one is assigned to a REMF. :roll:


Looks like a Soundoff Pinnicle lightbar and LED hide aways.


ai177.photobucket.com_albums_w220_surf_kat_Ford_20Raptor_DHSRaptor.jpg
 
The only way to effectively deal w/ the cartels is to asassinate the members at all levels, those that support them in any way up to and including family members. In effect kill nayone that has even the most remote connection. The outcry internationall would be immense.


I know of very few governments that have the stomach for this. Much less individuals. Personally, I draw the line at children.


For the most part, anyway.


Crappy deal all around.
 
sounds like they need sme "political reorganization" ala Full Metal Jacket


get all the drug cartels in one area then tactically nuke them.
 
People are missing the big picture. None of that is going to solve the problem. As long as people in the US keep buying cocaine on the local streetcorner, this will continue.


And I'm not defending crooked cops, but with all due respect to a lot of Mexican cops, they are treated like waiters here in the US... they are paid a substandard, less than living wage, and it's expected they'll make enough to survive on tips. La mordida is a way of life.
 
NPS Ranger said:
People are missing the big picture. None of that is going to solve the problem. As long as people in the US keep buying cocaine on the local streetcorner, this will continue.

And I'm not defending crooked cops, but with all due respect to a lot of Mexican cops, they are treated like waiters here in the US... they are paid a substandard, less than living wage, and it's expected they'll make enough to survive on tips. La mordida is a way of life.

Marijuana is the 'cash crop' with meth and meth precursor chemicals being a close second. Sheer volume of mota (marijuana) makes it #1. Unlike meth, cocaine, heroin, many people have bought into the idea that marijuana is not a dangerous drug. It is a losing battle (much like illegal immigration) due to the lobbies to change public perception.
 
11b101abn said:
The only way to effectively deal w/ the cartels is to asassinate the members at all levels, those that support them in any way up to and including family members. In effect kill nayone that has even the most remote connection. The outcry internationall would be immense.

I know of very few governments that have the stomach for this. Much less individuals. Personally, I draw the line at children.


For the most part, anyway.


Crappy deal all around.


That's exactly what the cartels do to each other, and it doesn't stop them. It won't stop them if a government does it. They'll do it as long as there is profit to be made, they'll keep doing it, and there is no practicable way to reduce the profit margin to the point that it wouldn't make sense to produce drugs illegally without a huge cultural and political paradigm shift.
 
Legalize weed in the US and all this goes away overnight. The war on drugs is winding down. The government lost and much like most of our wars it was a stupid wasteful battle that never should have been fought in the first place. There is not a rational informed human being on the face of the earth who believes that weed is more dangerous than alcohol because it simply isn't. Prohibition doesn't work. It never has and it never will.
 
John said:
Legalize weed in the US and all this goes away overnight. The war on drugs is winding down. The government lost and much like most of our wars it was a stupid wasteful battle that never should have been fought in the first place. There is not a rational informed human being on the face of the earth who believes that weed is more dangerous than alcohol because it simply isn't. Prohibition doesn't work. It never has and it never will.
Can't say this would be the right website to say that. I agree with most of it, but I'm sure plenty of people think weed is very dangerous.
 
John said:
Legalize weed in the US and all this goes away overnight. The war on drugs is winding down. The government lost and much like most of our wars it was a stupid wasteful battle that never should have been fought in the first place. There is not a rational informed human being on the face of the earth who believes that weed is more dangerous than alcohol because it simply isn't. Prohibition doesn't work. It never has and it never will.


Legalize, institute quality control standards that the FDA and DEA enforce, marketing/packaging information and tax it in order to raise federal and state revenue. License those who sell it in order to get more revenue. When an economy is built on an illegal substance, nations will go to great lengths to protect that economy.


The end user is just as complicit in the deaths as the corrupt government officials and cartel members.
 
surf_kat said:
Legalize, institute quality control standards that the FDA and DEA enforce, marketing/packaging information and tax it in order to raise federal and state revenue. License those who sell it in order to get more revenue. When an economy is built on an illegal substance, nations will go to great lengths to protect that economy.


The end user is just as complicit in the deaths as the corrupt government officials and cartel members.
Agreed. Except for that part about taxes. We're taxed way too much already. State sales tax is more than enough tax should they legalize marijuana.
 
"Tax being the taxes any tobacco farmer, cigarette company, brewer or distinct pays, or any purchaser pays. We still stumble over the occasional still, and there are still plenty of tax and distribution violations, but it's nothing like Prohibition.
 
This is what needs to happen. We need to send our troops to the border (i know they already sent some) but they need to be given orders to fire or return fire if fired apon and also cross into Mexico and chase down suspects since they Mexican Military and Mexican Police do it all the time. Geezzee the Mexican air force crosses over every week in helicopters in Zapata county Texas.
 
well thats what the mexicans might need when they see a couple of rockets streaking up their way...


The rockets red glare...


bombs bursting in air....
 

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