Motorola MCS2000 audio through vehicle stereo speaker

jfandco

Member
Jun 8, 2010
68
SE Wisconsin
Looking for some insight from some of the Moto junkies out there...


The new chief is getting ready to install an MCS2000 Type II in his POV. He doesn't have a lot of room (?? - it's an Expedition...) and doesn't like the size of the Moto speaker. My idea of "hide it" or "find a smaller speaker" didn't cure his itch for a "clean" install. Instead, he would like to have a hidden switch to toggle one or two of the stereo speakers in the front doors (probably front right) to be radio audio when desired, with the option to send it back to the stereo (but it would mostly be used as a dedicated communications radio speaker).


I don't mess much with Motorola radios other than installing them "like normal" in our rigs when needed. I understand from previous threads I've read that there are some tricky things dealing with the audio output from the MCS brains that would normally feed a passive or active speaker. What I need to know is if there is anything special I need to do to connect the audio from the speaker connector in the control head cable into a regular old 4Ohm speaker (i.e. the vehicle's front right door speaker). I guess I just don't know what is "on" that 2 pin connector... Is it a straight up 4Ohm, 8Ohm, ?? output? Is it differential and not tied to the chassis gnd?


I'm sure people have done this before on this board, but I couldn't find it via the search... Feel free to point me to another thread if there is one somewhere...


Thanks!
 
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PC Comms

Member
May 30, 2010
1,881
Beautiful southern Georgia!
I honestly would avoid this with this particular series of radio. (In my world, MCS stands for Mega Crappy Shitty.) There is the possibility of destroying the audio circuit in the radio if there is ever a "hiccup" with the speaker. Example: The switch fails and allows both audio from the stereo and the MCS to the speaker at the same time. I can GUARANTEE that you will damage the MCS. A suggestion, if I may. Drop the glove box door all the way down (VERY simple on the Fords) and if you look under the dash on the right, you will see a small spot where the speaker will fit PERFECTLY. I've done this on probably about 20 or so Ford trucks and it works like a charm. The acoustics of the spot actually amplify the speaker and it is out of the way. Hope this helps.
 

jfandco

Member
Jun 8, 2010
68
SE Wisconsin
Thanks for the input... Would some inline diode protection not prevent feedback power back into the MCS? I'll take a look at the spot you are mentioning in the glove box opening and see if that looks like something that will work on this truck. I think I know where you're talking about...


But let's pretend that it won't work there for whatever reason...and he REALLY wants to have it come through the car speaker...barring any failures of a switch, the wiring, etc...what's the output on that speaker connector "look like" electrically?


Thanks again for your help... :)
 

dustymedic

Member
May 21, 2010
633
Columbus,OH
Why a switch? When would a chief not need to monitor his FD radio when in his buggy???
 

PC Comms

Member
May 30, 2010
1,881
Beautiful southern Georgia!
medic550 said:
No the diode doesnt work as the mcs speakers leads are not grounded. Its a floating system.

+1 As dan said, you are going to need an isolation transformer and, to be honest, it just isn't worth it. Why not just disconnect the wires from the stereo going to that speaker and simply attach the external speaker lead wires from the radio to it? Down and dirty simple. The most he loses is one speaker in the stereo system. Honestly, I would just try my suggestion of mounting the speaker behind the glove box and see what he thinks. Every time I suggest it to someone the look at me like I'm crazy because they think they won't hear it well enough... but I've yet to have someone say they don't like it once they hear it for themselves.
 
May 24, 2010
1,627
PG County, MD
PC Comms said:
+1 As dan said, you are going to need an isolation transformer and, to be honest, it just isn't worth it. Why not just disconnect the wires from the stereo going to that speaker and simply attach the external speaker lead wires from the radio to it? Down and dirty simple. The most he loses is one speaker in the stereo system. Honestly, I would just try my suggestion of mounting the speaker behind the glove box and see what he thinks. Every time I suggest it to someone the look at me like I'm crazy because they think they won't hear it well enough... but I've yet to have someone say they don't like it once they hear it for themselves.

I agree with PC Comms, this is full of potential fail with the switch. It's cheaper to have a separate speaker ($15 - $25) for the radio then try to tie it into the stereo system with a switch, have the switch fail in some and fry the audio board in the radio ($325 flat rate repair, last time I checked).


Since he wants a clean install, is he also hiding the radio somewhere in his POV?
 

Bikinjohn

Member
Jul 22, 2010
68
USA Nevada
There are many companies that make auxiliary inputs for factory stereos. You could have the audio from the radio go in to the aux input so all he has to do is press a button on the stereo to hear the moto.
 
May 24, 2010
1,627
PG County, MD
Bikinjohn said:
There are many companies that make auxiliary inputs for factory stereos. You could have the audio from the radio go in to the aux input so all he has to do is press a button on the stereo to hear the moto.

OP still needs an isolation transformer so as not to fry the audio board in the MCS2000.
 

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