Thoughts on reserves?

cory y

Member
May 21, 2010
1,614
chono said:
I was wondering what all your guys and gals thoughts on police reserves are? Love em or hate em?

depends on what state you are in. Different states define "police reserves" differently


Here in TX Reserve officers are Fully fledged peace officers with all power and priveldges execpt for pay, and cannot work off duty jobs
 

Mike L.

Member
May 21, 2010
261
Everett, WA
Well since I used to be a reserve I guess I am biased but I loved it. I was lucky because I was on a department that treated us as equals rather than as flaggers with a gun. We had excellent training and were given a lot of freedom. In fact every year the full timers would take a day off for their guild christmas party and us reserves would patrol the city (a full time watch commander would be present with us). Lots of fond memories but when I left my CSO position due to pay issues they ended my Reserve status as well.


If a department as a whole is supportive of a reserve program then that program could be one of the best resources for a city or county. However, if they treat the reserves like crap and don't respect them then it can bite the agency in the ass. A reserve program is one of the best ways to educate the public about LE.


My old department had explorers, reserves, CSO's, Senior Patrol, Citizens Academy, and Teen Academy. With all of these our city populus had a healthy respect for our dept and our job - even when other depts were facing scrutiny over use of force, tactics, etc.
 

Stendec

Member
May 21, 2010
816
Mike L. said:
Well since I used to be a reserve I guess I am biased but I loved it. I was lucky because I was on a department that treated us as equals rather than as flaggers with a gun. We had excellent training and were given a lot of freedom. In fact every year the full timers would take a day off for their guild christmas party and us reserves would patrol the city (a full time watch commander would be present with us). Lots of fond memories but when I left my CSO position due to pay issues they ended my Reserve status as well.

If a department as a whole is supportive of a reserve program then that program could be one of the best resources for a city or county. However, if they treat the reserves like crap and don't respect them then it can bite the agency in the ass. A reserve program is one of the best ways to educate the public about LE.


My old department had explorers, reserves, CSO's, Senior Patrol, Citizens Academy, and Teen Academy. With all of these our city populus had a healthy respect for our dept and our job - even when other depts were facing scrutiny over use of force, tactics, etc.

In all seriousness, what he said. Whatever they are called, non-full-timers can be a huge force multiplier and a valuable adjunct to any agency, assuming that they are properly selected and managed, and that they, the agency, and the full-time staff all understand what their role is or is not. I've run into a lot of reserves/auxiliaries/specials/whatever who couldn't police a kitchen, but the same goes for a lot of full-timers, particularly in smaller agencies that can't afford to be too selective. Then I've also run into hobby cops with PhDs, law degrees, medical degrees, and others who had little formal education but were fantastic coppers, better than a lot of regulars.


The only concern I have is in agencies, usually Sheriff's Offices, where commissions are handed out as political favors, regardless of the person's qualifications. Like Elvis's DEA commission from Nixon. She's one of my all-time favorite actresses, but Mira Sorvino is an "honorary" Deputy Sheriff in PA or NY. She has many positive attributes, but I'm unaware of any outstanding skill or knowledge of policing.
 

tnems7

Member
May 21, 2010
407
USA Nashville Tennessee
Memphis and Knoxville Police Departments have reserve officers who must complete basic training and maintain annual training and qualifications. This was a way for both departments to have SWAT Medics and in Memphis, to have paramedics and flight observers on their helicopters. It is also a way for some former full-time officers who have entered another profession to use their police background. It has also allowed the departments to use those reserve officers to teach special topics in annual training - i.e. a pharmacist teaching drug recognition, a lawyer instructing on special legal points, or a doctor or paramedic on gun shot wounds and trauma care.
 

Paul

Member
May 21, 2010
63
Arizona
My office has reserves.


They go through the exact same training, same yearly training, and same FTO program. They dont typically work off duty jobs but in the event they cant find another sworn deputy, I have heard where a reserve could jump at it. Once they have completed FTO, they may take over a beat when they want and if the district is full, they just go out as a second unit. They are also used in the special areas such as internet crimes and warrant "teams". In the office, there is no need to understand what a reserve can and cannot do as they can do whatever a full-timer does. Also, were on a hiring freeze but as soon as they start to hire, they will pull all the reserves that want to go full time, starting with those who are done with FTO, and then pick (if they have to) from those who are certified, just not done with FTO. So I am assuming our first "class" will just be made up of reserves which is pretty easy, just go to HR and fill out payment and benfit related items.


In other words, I think it is a good program.
 

WPD8908

Member
May 21, 2010
642
NW Ohio
My department has both Auxiliary and reserves we have defined it this way:


Auxiliary Officers : are NON-certified persons who are attending the police academy they assist the department with traffic control at various events including parades festivals and anything needed by a certified officer. may not carry a weapon regardless of age, qualifications.


Reserve Officers: Are certified persons who are of age and have completed basic police academy . are certified and may work in the capacity with full arrest powers. they assist full / part time officers at anytime, may carry a firearm (on duty) and may operate a police vehicle, and issue citations for traffic offenses. may arrest for ORC violations. After 6 months may apply to carry weapon (off duty) if approved by Chief of police


they are very valuable and sometimes a hindrance
 

ParkPiggy

Member
May 21, 2010
667
Northeast Ohio
Weired about the no off duty carry. Since HR218 was passed, if you are a commissioner\d officer who carrys on duty, you are permitted to carry off duty. Although, I guess your dept's chief could discipline basing it as policy.


Anyway, my full time dept has reserves, who are commissioned officers. They have to volunteer 16hrs a month, and attend all required yearly dept training. They do not do solo patrol, are not permitted to work side jobs, but are permitted to carry off duty. They are asked to help with events requiring traffic or crowd control. We have no part time nor do we have non-commissioned auxiliary officers.


My part time dept has full and part time, but no reserves or auxiliaries.
 

Bonanno

Member
May 21, 2010
535
Neptune, NJ
In NJ we have a classification for this called Special Offiers.


Class I Special Officers: typically 80hr academy in basic LE, First Aid, Summons writing, MV Law, Communications, Self-defense, Hand-cuffing. Class I's do not have arrest powers or carry a firearm. They typically only have a set of handcuffs for detention purposes, OC, a Baton, and a Radio. They are basically extra manpower for presence and for parking enforcement, traffic control, beach patrol, etc.


Class II Special Officers: Typically 600+hrs of Academy, same as a Class A (full-time sworn officer). Full LE Powers on-duty and carry firearm on-duty. Off-duty no powers, no off-duty carry. Have to remain under 40hrs a week. Can be used for anything and has no restriction on duty I believe.


All Special officers have to where a Special Police Officer I or Special Police Officer II Patch on right sleeve to denote what they are. Also most Dept's have restriction on the amount of Specials they can employ, exception to this are certain shore towns where the population increases substantially in the summer and more police are needed.


Being a Class II is a great stepping stone to become full-time because it allows the possibility of getting the Academy waived and only having to return to take certain selected classes for remedial/review as decided by the NJ Police Training Commission on a case by case basis.


I currently am a Class II Officer. I have worked in a car, on foot, and on a bike. Been assigned a patrol zone, or an area (Bar) to stay at for police presence throughout my shift. Also been called in to cover shifts with vacancies or for emergencies when more officers are needed.
 

WPD8908

Member
May 21, 2010
642
NW Ohio
ParkPiggy said:
Weired about the no off duty carry. Since HR218 was passed, if you are a commissioner\d officer who carrys on duty, you are permitted to carry off duty. Although, I guess your dept's chief could discipline basing it as policy.

Anyway, my full time dept has reserves, who are commissioned officers. They have to volunteer 16hrs a month, and attend all required yearly dept training. They do not do solo patrol, are not permitted to work side jobs, but are permitted to carry off duty. They are asked to help with events requiring traffic or crowd control. We have no part time nor do we have non-commissioned auxiliary officers.


My part time dept has full and part time, but no reserves or auxiliaries.

Insurance Company's Policy
 

Ben E.

Member
May 21, 2010
2,417
Iowa, USA
Like 'em. I work for a small department so we only have 2 reserves. They are great to have, they will work pretty much any shift you need them to if someone's sick or something like that. One of the guys has been here for about 4 years, speaks spanish fluently, very people friendly. The other kid has been here for about a year, is WAY too gung-ho about being a "cop", works all the time, and is annoying as hell. Also thinks he knows everything but then asks if he did it right after he messes up. Still a decent kid though, and good to have around.


Bottom line, I think reserves are great. There are not many other jobs that you could find people willing to work for free!
 

rescue

Member
May 22, 2010
78
Rayne , LA
Im a member of the reserve unit that our department has . We have a total of 30 reserve officers . Right now we are going through a reserve academy that consist of everything a real academy teaches you . We are allowed to do what ever a full time officer can do as long as we have the appropriate training . I feel that a reserve unit is a good resource to have in need of extra help . We do work for free unless a full time is out for some reason then we get paid .
 

RJ*

Member
May 21, 2010
346
Finland
Jared @ 911Lights said:
Level 2: Full Police Powers except Fire Arms or Traffic Stops


and are allowed to work with any division.

So, theoretically, you could have unarmed SWAT? Or traffic units that can't do traffic stops? :D :p
 

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