Volunteering, Code 3 and insurance

norcalbusa

Member
May 23, 2010
73
California
Here in Kalifornia, CHP must issue a special certificate dealio for any fire volunteer to run Code 3- and they never issue them. But let's say they did- for those at state's that allow private vehicles Code 3, do you declare that with your auto insurance? Does it cost extra/how much? I think my broker would laguh until he fell out fo his chair, but clearly there's a way for it to work elswhere.
 

Fluffy126577

New Member
May 24, 2010
721
Toledo, OH
Here where I am at in Ohio. Once the pager drops with tones and we decide to respond, we are declared emergency vehicles on the road responding with our agency therefore we are covered under the Townships insurance. They are very strict about who we can bring on due to driving issues due to that fact. SO basically from pager tones to going back in service we are township employees and are covered as such.


**Edit** -


I did in fact tell my insurance carrier that I was responding code with my vehicle and they also stated the same thing. They did offer me a nice policy that covers everything extra on my car (i.e. - light bar, siren, lights so on and so forth) That is they were damaged or stolen they would cover it. So I thought that was freaking awesome.
 
May 21, 2010
1,176
NJ & IA
I did not state this to my insurance, and coincidentally the gentleman dealing with my case is also a volunteer f/f so i am allowed to submit my claim for what ever equipment was damaged in the crash and i will be reimbursed for it. However my accident did NOT occur while responding to an emergency or performing any sort of emergency services function.


I was returning from a duty shift at my first aid building at the time of the crash but that doesn't really count...
 

Amanda

Member
May 24, 2010
193
NY, USA
Even though I'm in NY, with my department from the second the pager drops until 20 minutes after you leave the station you are covered by the departments insurance. Weird time, but they figure within 20 minutes you'll be home since it's a small town. But if something happened to one of us while we're returning, it'd be considered a line of duty injury.
 
May 21, 2010
153
Calhoun, TN
I don't know of any special policies designed to cover POV's. In Tennessee you can legally run lights & siren on a POV in two ways; one you can have your vehicle registered through the state as an emergency vehicle, or two you can be authorized by a written letter to the sheriff or police chief from your fire chief. If you go the second route you are only an emergency vehicle when responding or on scene. There are some insurance agencies around here that will require you to carry commercial vehicle insurance if you register the vehicle as an emergency vehicle. It's just easier for us to let the chief write a letter. It would be wise to inform your insurance though, even if there isn't anything in your policy saying you can't use emergency lights & siren.
 

tcfd823

Member
May 21, 2010
368
CENARK
In Arkansas, Volly POVs are not considered emergency vehicles. Granted, we do need written permission from the FD chief to run coded, but we are asking for the right of way, not demanding. I told my insurance agent about running coded in my vehicle, and my rate actually DROPPED!! In their eyes, yes im driving fast with lots of light and lots of noise, but you have to be aware of your surroundings. More-so than if you were just toolin' down the road at 65mph.


I don't understand their reasonings, but hey, if they want to lower my rate (and raise my coverage w/ a lower rate) its fine by me.
 

MATT3045

Member
May 23, 2010
269
Akron Ohio area
Fluffy126577 said:
Here where I am at in Ohio. Once the pager drops with tones and we decide to respond, we are declared emergency vehicles on the road responding with our agency therefore we are covered under the Townships insurance. They are very strict about who we can bring on due to driving issues due to that fact. SO basically from pager tones to going back in service we are township employees and are covered as such.

**Edit** -


I did in fact tell my insurance carrier that I was responding code with my vehicle and they also stated the same thing. They did offer me a nice policy that covers everything extra on my car (i.e. - light bar, siren, lights so on and so forth) That is they were damaged or stolen they would cover it. So I thought that was freaking awesome.

Sorry to say it, but you are wrong about it. Your townshup might cover you, but they are not required to. You are required to have insurance. My department, current and old one, does not cover when people are responding to the station. You wreck you better be able to back it. I know it for a fact, one of the guys on my old FD got into a wreck responding and was required to have his insurance cover it. On my current FD, one of the guys hit a deer responding, and his insurance had to cover it.
 

Fluffy126577

New Member
May 24, 2010
721
Toledo, OH
MATT3045 said:
Sorry to say it, but you are wrong about it. Your townshup might cover you, but they are not required to. You are required to have insurance. My department, current and old one, does not cover when people are responding to the station. You wreck you better be able to back it. I know it for a fact, one of the guys on my old FD got into a wreck responding and was required to have his insurance cover it. On my current FD, one of the guys hit a deer responding, and his insurance had to cover it.

Again, that's why I said "Here, where I am at in Ohio" because I assumed not everyone in Ohio would run the same way. Obviously there would be nothing to cover the entire state because why would the state want to have that liability?? It is going to vary from place to place and department from department. I could go to the next township in my own county and they could be different. I wouldn't post something that I have not 1) Researched myself by asking the fire chief and trustee's and 2) Asking my insurance agency.


So to say that I am "wrong" is ridiculous to be honest. Even yourself said that my township may cover me and that in fact they do. Next time I would think instead of calling someone "wrong" You would compare and contrast before jumping that gun.


**Edit** -


Also, You mentioned that I am required to have insurance but why when I mentioned it to them they wouldn't sell me a policy to go with responding code. Maybe when you said I had to have insurance meaning actually having insurance then, yes I do (Like every other responsible person should), but no "special" policy or addition to my normal policy to include responding code. I would assume any insurance agent from shady to the most distinguished would jump at the opportunity to sell me additional policies like this.
 

Fluffy126577

New Member
May 24, 2010
721
Toledo, OH
JHEATHJR said:
It will help to ""See"" where you are in Ohio on your info ;) then there be no questions :cool: :arrow: See Mine :arrow:

Actually for me your over <!~ There. :) I will agree with you that possibly "seeing" where I am at in Ohio might have made a difference but in this instance? I don't believe so. Just a matter of opinion I suppose.
 

TNFF412N

Member
May 22, 2010
387
San Antonio, Texas
RuralFireMedic said:
I don't know of any special policies designed to cover POV's. In Tennessee you can legally run lights & siren on a POV in two ways; one you can have your vehicle registered through the state as an emergency vehicle, or two you can be authorized by a written letter to the sheriff or police chief from your fire chief. If you go the second route you are only an emergency vehicle when responding or on scene. There are some insurance agencies around here that will require you to carry commercial vehicle insurance if you register the vehicle as an emergency vehicle. It's just easier for us to let the chief write a letter. It would be wise to inform your insurance though, even if there isn't anything in your policy saying you can't use emergency lights & siren.

I am wondering what you are referencing and who are you getting to register your vehicle as an emergency vehicle? my understanding is that by state law you are able to run lights and sirens but you are not considered an emergency vehicle. We have progressive and they make policies for VFF and EMT and so on, i got the extra coverage to cover my equipment and stuff inside from theft.......
 
May 22, 2010
239
Hunterdon County NJ
For All 3 of my departments if I am involved in a crash while responding to station (and I think it covers the ride home also), im covered by thier insurance, my insurance agent is also on a fire dept and said the rates will stay the same. One of members has hit severeal deer over the years and the squads insurance covered him every time.
 

Boss429

Member
May 21, 2010
261
Pennsylvania
As soon as the pager alerts (and we decide to respond) we are employees of the borough. The Chief's vehicles turn into emergency vehicles (red lights) when they decide to respond. I do not believe that our vehicles are covered by the borough, but personally we are.
 
May 21, 2010
153
Calhoun, TN
TNFF412N said:
I am wondering what you are referencing and who are you getting to register your vehicle as an emergency vehicle? my understanding is that by state law you are able to run lights and sirens but you are not considered an emergency vehicle. We have progressive and they make policies for VFF and EMT and so on, i got the extra coverage to cover my equipment and stuff inside from theft.......
TNEMS7 (on here) emailed me the form to register a POV through the state. The form must be signed by your fire chief. The alternative is to have written notice sent to the Sheriff or Police Chief that you are a member of the Fire Dept.


Tennessee Code Annotated 55-9-201


section c


© (1) Members of regular or volunteer fire departments may equip their privately owned vehicles to be used in responding to a fire alarm or other emergency with warning devices approved by the local fire chief, upon written certification to the local sheriff or police chief that the person is a member of the department. In the event the warning devices are abused or used for other than their intended purpose by a member of the fire department, the local fire chief shall revoke the member's privilege of using the warning devices and shall notify, in writing, the local sheriff or police chief of the revocation.
 

emtmike

Member
May 24, 2010
763
brooklyn,ny
well here in nyc we run code, and are considered emergency vehicles with red lights and sirens, and if we wreck responding to a call we are covered under my dept's insurance if we are found not to have broken a law, but if you run a stop sign a light or anything like that and you wreck, well your s.o.l.
 

UndercoverVLS

Member
Jun 1, 2010
337
NY
Where I am in NY, as stated as soon as the pagers goes off you are covered under the departments insurance for injury but NOT any type of automobile insurance. But, I am told that your insurance company CANNOT raise your rates after you file a claim. Almost like its a freebee. It'll still be on your license as an accident but your rates cant jump because of it.
 
May 21, 2010
1,176
NJ &amp; IA
As told for the future by my insurance company. I am adding an endorsement of $18 for every 6 months that states that any aftermarket equipment that is installed in my vehicle is insured. This will also cover costs of installation work ie labor up to $2500. Good deal for me.
 

tnems7

Member
May 21, 2010
407
USA Nashville Tennessee
The Application for Authorization of an Emergency Vehicle in Tennessee is filed with the Legal Office of the Department of Safety, but it is not needed or routinely used by fire departments, rescue squads or public EMS agencies. Other parts of the Tennessee Code apply to those vehicles as long as the chief official of the fire department or rescue squad sign off for the individual responder and certify that to the local law enforcement official.


It used to be that if you responded outside of your home jurisdiction, then you needed the State authorization for liability protection to say you were an authorized emergency vehicle. For Fire, rescue, and EMS, the Mutual Aid and Assistance Act of 2004 and later amendments apparently eased that burden, because you are extended the same rights (when dispatched) that you have in your home locality. Trying to read and figure out the laws is a lot like filing an income tax form with the IRS. Hopefully you qualify locally and get to use the "short form" by getting the local letter. If certain other conditions apply, then you need to complete, "the long form". And it is always a good idea to get a rider on your own personal automobile liability insurance.


State agencies other than Dept. of Safety, TBI, Forestry, and TEMA, which are specifically addressed in the Code have had to file the State Dept. of Safety form, such as the State EMS office, fire marshal, TDOT, TOSHA, and commercial responders like haz mat clean up teams and industrial fire departments that have to use public roads. These organizations are insured differently (State Board of Claims, or self-insurance pools with high deductibles) and those factors have to be reviewed.


There may be a difference among individuals in registering depending upon the affiliations of departments. If you are only associated with one jurisdiction, then you may only need the local letter. If you serve with several agencies in different cities and counties, then you may need a State AEV authorization letter. When in doubt, contact the Legal Office of the Department of Safety.


tnems7


Richard Land
 

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