Do you like having ride alongs?

Ben E.

Member
May 21, 2010
2,417
Iowa, USA
I've never had a ride along that wasn't a friend, so I can't really say. Luckily we can choose whether or not we have a rider. Unless it's someone I know, I'll probably say know even though I LOVED doing ridealongs and know how much other people like them. There seems to be some weirdos that like to ride.
 
Jul 14, 2010
1,639
S.W. Ohio USA
I never cared unless they were forced on me. Most were friends. I rode last Friday night with a big city PD. It was with a friend, a kid I field trained years ago. Had a blast, and we were busy. Hadn't been in a cruiser since I retired. Fun, and makes me miss it some, but mostly reminds me why I retired! Made me proud when he told his shift in roll call I taught him the ropes.
 

Stendec

Member
May 21, 2010
816
Like jury duty and voting, every citizen should do it, at least once, as long as it isn't with me. It's just a matter of having my stuff laid out on the passenger side in a certain way, and never having trained deploying longs guns out of the rack without muzzling up a passenger.
 

ParkPiggy

Member
May 21, 2010
667
Northeast Ohio
I don't mind them. I get 2-3 a year, and most are young adults looking at a career in law enforcement. Both my departments allow them, and the Officer can just bring someone out, they just have to sign the waiver. My full time dept has more, and gets more of the folks who don't know anyone, and just want to ride-so they are scheduled with you. Sadly I've had a few at the park, who incorrectly think we are going to go out for 8hrs and pet squirrels and hug trees-those are the ones you pray for felony stops during the shift!!
 

FireEMSPolice

Member
May 21, 2010
3,429
Ohio
I used to ride with my future Father-In-Law (a police lieutenant) but his department changed the policy last year to family only can ride. Pissed me off since I do not yet qualify until I marry his daughter.
 
May 20, 2010
215
Hamilton, Ohio
I agree with stendec, everyone should do it as long as it is not with me. I have had riders forced on me in the past when I was new to the road, but I will not take them now. The reason I will not take them now is that we had a pursuit several years ago and my supervisor knowing I had a civilian in the car had me drop out of the pursuit to handle other calls that were backing up :evil: . I am also very particular about my cruiser and how it is set up. When I have a rider and all my stuff is moved around I feel like somebody just came in my house and moved stuff I have had in the same place for years.
 

rwo978

Member
May 21, 2010
5,196
ND, USA
Double edged sword.... It's good for them to see how it's like, and much not like "TV". But, mussing up your 'office' is somewhat annoying. In reality, I don't mind them too much. A couple other guys and I seem to have proportionately more assigned to use than others because we're willing to take them. The majority of them are kids from the Youth Academy (similar to Explorers) or Citizens Academy.
 

Jarred J.

Lifetime VIP Donor
May 21, 2010
11,517
Shelbyville, TN
when i did my ridealong i got to see how jacked up the install on our citys cars were. they had their radar wired to a cig plug that was barely screwed into the console. the wire coming off the plug was 16 gauge that was butt spliced into a 22 gauge wire that went under the carpet somewhere. everytime i moved my foot a certain way his radar would cut off. i asked him if he liked ridealongs and he said there good to have but he didnt like moving his office around either.
 
May 21, 2010
153
Calhoun, TN
I'm not a LEO, but I do have ride-alongs on my ambulance periodically. The majority of them are EMT or medic students, some have been volunteer fire or rescue. It's really a case by case basis for me. Some of them have been a tremendous help & others are just in the way. The ones who really want to be there are usually a great help to have along. I sometimes grow tired of having students with us, but we all had to start somewhere. I always try to be very accomodating & go the extra mile for the ones who are interested in learning.
 

ISU_Cyclone

Member
May 21, 2010
1,447
SE Wisconsin, USA
patrol530 said:
I didn't do any ride alongs. I completed the academy, and the first time I occupied the right seat was as a trainee.

Well you just took away the point I wanted to make ;)


But from someone who HAS participated in a ride along (or 50), they are helpful to those interested and expose people to some of the realities of the job. So please don't deny someone an opportunity because it may be an inconvenience for 8 or less hours :)
 

FireEMSPolice

Member
May 21, 2010
3,429
Ohio
waaaahhhh I gotta move all my shit around wahhhhhh


All I hear is a bunch of crying. Grab your gear and stick it on the back or the trunk. Not hard. Every time I rode with an officer, alot of the crap in the bag isnt that essential (flashlight cone, cover for hat, extra forms). Alot of that is already up front any way without there being extra.


Kinda hypocritical to say they should ride as long as its not with me. As stated earlier, we all had to start somewhere. So what if you have to take another call? Ride alongs typically are there to get a small taste of what its like. Treating them like shit or making them feel unwanted does them a disservice. Granted there are some people who show no interest in public safety and shouldnt ride, but most want to see what its like.


What chaps me more is seeing sworn officers not wanting Reserves/Auxiliaries riding with them. Why not? Its not enough that they come out for free (to do a job you prolly wouldnt do for free) but to make them feel unwanted is even more disheartening. When I was an Auxiliary, I used to hear all the moaning and belly-aching. If you were the low man on the pole, you got a rider unless someone stepped up or the Sgt knew you didnt mind.


Sorry for the rant or sounding like an asshole but it just rubs me the wrong way.
 

rwo978

Member
May 21, 2010
5,196
ND, USA
FireEMSPolice said:
waaaahhhh I gotta move all my shit around wahhhhhh

All I hear is a bunch of crying. Grab your gear and stick it on the back or the trunk. Not hard. Every time I rode with an officer, alot of the crap in the bag isnt that essential (flashlight cone, cover for hat, extra forms). Alot of that is already up front any way without there being extra.


Kinda hypocritical to say they should ride as long as its not with me. As stated earlier, we all had to start somewhere. So what if you have to take another call? Ride alongs typically are there to get a small taste of what its like. Treating them like shit or making them feel unwanted does them a disservice. Granted there are some people who show no interest in public safety and shouldnt ride, but most want to see what its like.


What chaps me more is seeing sworn officers not wanting Reserves/Auxiliaries riding with them. Why not? Its not enough that they come out for free (to do a job you prolly wouldnt do for free) but to make them feel unwanted is even more disheartening. When I was an Auxiliary, I used to hear all the moaning and belly-aching. If you were the low man on the pole, you got a rider unless someone stepped up or the Sgt knew you didnt mind.


Sorry for the rant or sounding like an asshole but it just rubs me the wrong way.

Are you a cop? Do you know what it's like to have an 'office' uprooted? No on both, right?


It throws you off, which is what most guys are saying. True, you don't use 90% of the crap in your bag. But, just at the point you don't grab something from your bag you're going to have to fish around in your bag, in the trunk for it. It's a little awkward.


Until you know anything about this, your opinion is moot.
 

Stendec

Member
May 21, 2010
816
FireEMSPolice said:
waaaahhhh I gotta move all my shit around wahhhhhh

All I hear is a bunch of crying. Grab your gear and stick it on the back or the trunk. Not hard. Every time I rode with an officer, alot of the crap in the bag isnt that essential (flashlight cone, cover for hat, extra forms). Alot of that is already up front any way without there being extra.

OK then, I guess you told us. Now when can I stop over and rearrange your toolbox, or medicine cabinet or underwear drawer?


If I'm carrying it. it's essential. Try being a cop, instead of just riding with one, and needing to find those extra TASER cartridges RIGHT NOW.


Stick it in back? Are you insane? Next time you ride, volunteer to ride in back, and after about thirty seconds you'll be begging for the 55 gallon drum of hand sanitizer. We could restart the entire US military biological warfare program with just a couple swabbings from the back seat of the typical patrol car. I wont put anything in back that I'm not willing to burn.
 

Rofocowboy84

Member
May 20, 2010
1,161
Centre County, PA
rwo978 said:
It throws you off, which is what most guys are saying. True, you don't use 90% of the crap in your bag. But, just at the point you don't grab something from your bag you're going to have to fish around in your bag, in the trunk for it. It's a little awkward.


It's even more awkward when the ride along is a hot girl, and you go to get something out of your bag only to find out your hand is in her crotch, lol!
 

FireEMSPolice

Member
May 21, 2010
3,429
Ohio
rwo978 said:
Are you a cop? Do you know what it's like to have an 'office' uprooted? No on both, right?

It throws you off, which is what most guys are saying. True, you don't use 90% of the crap in your bag. But, just at the point you don't grab something from your bag you're going to have to fish around in your bag, in the trunk for it. It's a little awkward.


Until you know anything about this, your opinion is moot.

I was an Auxiliary Deputy. Yes, I know what its like to have my "office" uprooted, rearranged, etc. Change sucks, so adapt.

Stendec said:
OK then, I guess you told us. Now when can I stop over and rearrange your toolbox, or medicine cabinet or underwear drawer?
If I'm carrying it. it's essential. Try being a cop, instead of just riding with one, and needing to find those extra TASER cartridges RIGHT NOW.


Stick it in back? Are you insane? Next time you ride, volunteer to ride in back, and after about thirty seconds you'll be begging for the 55 gallon drum of hand sanitizer. We could restart the entire US military biological warfare program with just a couple swabbings from the back seat of the typical patrol car. I wont put anything in back that I'm not willing to burn.

Ive seen many officers take the gear and put it in the back seat, or in the trunk.


Maybe I just kept a clean car all the time so it wasnt that bad back there.


The good thing was that our Sheriff was a former Auxiliary back when he first started out so he had their back more times then none.
 

mcpd2025

Member
May 20, 2010
1,557
Maryland, USA
I did ride alongs as a civilian for college classes and had fun. I think it is a good program and I believe that everyone should do it once to get a better idea of what police work is like. So many people have opinions about police work that are based upon their personal experiences, and usually their experience with the police are during the worst moment of their life (traffic stop, wreck, you were just robbed/burglarized/raped/assaulted, etc). All the important things that *I* need right away are on my belt or in my pockets. We transport our prisoners in the front passenger seat, so I don't store anything there but paperwork, which can easily be moved. My traffic cone and vest, criminal citations, reference books etc are in the backseat behind me. Traffic tickets, repair orders and warnings are in the front door. Legal pad is in the visor, map is in the passenger visor. Don't carry a Taser or long gun. I don't run laser while I have a ride along, cause it can get boring for them.


I have friends ride with me sometimes, and while I don't LIKE stranger ride alongs, I don't hate them. Its annoying when you have someone who wants to play 20 questions about everything though. Whats this, why is that, what does that mean, what was that code, what do you use that for, have you ever killed anyone, etc etc.


New dispatchers have to go on a ride along as part of training, interns get a couple ride alongs a year, we have a citizens academy where they do a ride along. I am an Alcohol Enforcement Specialist with our department, so we put on training for prosecutors and judges. I have had a couple prosecutors ride with me for a night to see the application of the training. Judges.... I've managed to avoid having them ride with me!!! New hire police candidates are eligible for ride alongs, I have had a couple of those too.
 

EVModules

Member
May 16, 2010
864
Deer Park, WA
At available times, I've gone on ride-alongs for the sole purpose to understand what the officer expects from his vehicle to help him. It can be lighting, placement of equipments, etc. My background as a FF is way different than an officer so I try to place myself into their shoes to see how I can improve the vehicle / equipment to better serve them. A good example is that I learned & observed that the corner light of the lightbar is distracting to the officers whenever they perform a felony stop. I pitched the idea of having the corner module shut off whenever the door's open. He said the guys would buy me lunch if I could do that on the next vehicles! After discussing the option with management, they thought it was an idea worth considering. I did it for them at no cost in exchange for knowing we went the extra mile = repeat business.


I'm always, always learning and when things get slow, I jump in for a ride-along whenever a new vehicle gets introduced in various aspects of their jobs.
 

Ben E.

Member
May 21, 2010
2,417
Iowa, USA
FireEMSPolice said:
What chaps me more is seeing sworn officers not wanting Reserves/Auxiliaries riding with them. Why not?

Because the one that always wants to ride stinks like cat piss, makes weird tick noises like tourett's syndrom, tells me 50 times a night "man I hope we get into a chase or get a big drug bust", or "let's go bust some speeders". Dude, shut the fuck up. I have more than just 2 highways to patrol, mainly a downtown and residential area which make up the other 99% of this town. You don't know how to do the paperwork, so you're gonna point out someone for me to stop then make me do all the work, because all you want to do is make sure someone you know sees you on the side of the road in uniform.


On the other hand, our OTHER reserve is awesome and he can ride with me any time.
 

rwo978

Member
May 21, 2010
5,196
ND, USA
Ben E. said:
Because the one that always wants to ride stinks like cat piss, makes weird tick noises like tourett's syndrom, tells me 50 times a night "man I hope we get into a chase or get a big drug bust", or "let's go bust some speeders". Dude, shut the FUCK up.

HA :D :lol:
 

Ben E.

Member
May 21, 2010
2,417
Iowa, USA
FireEMSPolice said:
I was an Auxiliary Deputy. Yes, I know what its like to have my "office" uprooted, rearranged, etc. Change sucks, so adapt.

I'm not talking down to you for being "just an auxiliary" so don't take it like that. But being an Auxiliary, did you have your own car, that only you drove, or you only shared it with one other person who mutually agreed on how the car was setup? Or was it a pool car that all the auxiliary's drove? In the case of a deputy with a takehome car, or in my case where I don't take my car home but only one other guy drives it, My patrol bag never moves out of the passenger seat, my partner that drives the car uses it as well. The heat and A/C controls don't move, the side mirrors are rearview don't move, because we are the same hieght. Hell, the radio station rarely changes. The volume on the radio doesn't change. I don't have to worry about where the cap to my spit bottle is, because it's probably still in the door handle. What I'm getting at is when you spend 12 hours in the SAME patrol car every day, I expect nothing to change. When I have someone else in there fucking shit up, it sucks ass. Every once in awhile that dumb ass reserve will drive our car and it ends up smelling like cat piss, he leaves the steering wheel jacked up like a school bus, and has the seat back 2 inches away from the steering wheel. My bag has extra shit in it, the ticket book is laying on it's seat, there's used PBT straw wrappers on the floorboard, and my spit bottle cap is nowhere to be found. I just want to be able to get in my car and drive it like every other day.
 
May 20, 2010
215
Hamilton, Ohio
Ben E. said:
I'm not talking down to you for being "just an auxiliary" so don't take it like that. But being an Auxiliary, did you have your own car, that only you drove, or you only shared it with one other person who mutually agreed on how the car was setup? Or was it a pool car that all the auxiliary's drove? In the case of a deputy with a takehome car, or in my case where I don't take my car home but only one other guy drives it, My patrol bag never moves out of the passenger seat, my partner that drives the car uses it as well. The heat and A/C controls don't move, the side mirrors are rearview don't move, because we are the same hieght. Hell, the radio station rarely changes. The volume on the radio doesn't change. I don't have to worry about where the cap to my spit bottle is, because it's probably still in the door handle. What I'm getting at is when you spend 12 hours in the SAME patrol car every day, I expect nothing to change. When I have someone else in there FUCKING shit up, it sucks ass. Every once in awhile that dumb ass reserve will drive our car and it ends up smelling like cat piss, he leaves the steering wheel jacked up like a school bus, and has the seat back 2 inches away from the steering wheel. My bag has extra shit in it, the ticket book is laying on it's seat, there's used PBT straw wrappers on the floorboard, and my spit bottle cap is nowhere to be found. I just want to be able to get in my car and drive it like every other day.

Ben you hit it dead on brother! I don't share a car and have my own take-home, but 5 years ago we shared cars and I can tell you it is nice sharing with someone that you have a consent agreement on how the office you share will be kept! When someone else is in the car and all your stuff is moved, my shift is discombobulated and caddywompused the whole night, it FUCKING SUCKS ASS!
 

Stendec

Member
May 21, 2010
816
EVModules said:
You seem all sensitive, acting like it's your property when it's actually belongs to the taxpayers!

You're right. I'll take a rider, so that they can tell all the other taxpayers about the shaking that starts at about 75 mph, the constant burning smell, and how the headliner is tacked up with staples. I shouldn't be Bogarting all this fun.
 
May 20, 2010
215
Hamilton, Ohio
EVModules said:
You seem all sensitive, acting like it's your property when it's actually belongs to the taxpayers!


All of the "property" that I keep in my passenger seat battle bag is mine not to mention a lot of other things in my car, I paid for all of it out of my own pocket. And the whole taxpayer line, I will remember that the next time some asshole pisses himself in my backseat, I will see how many taxpayers line up to clean the mess up in their car. I find it interesting though in my line of work that people actually want to take their time out of their life to see what I do for a living. I really don't know of many other professions that people will do that. But imagine this, you are a vehicle upfitter and someone wants to come into your shop and watch you work. But before they come in you have to move all of your stuff around in your shop before they get there for some reason or another. Then you are in the middle of working on a car wondering where you moved your wire snips to because they aren't in the same spot they have been in for years. It would get frustrating if everytime you needed to do something, or needed to find something, that you had to figure out where you put it and waste the time doing so. Don't get me wrong, I think it is neat that people wanna see what we do and that we can show them its not like the 23 minutes of tape on COPS all the time, but having them revel in the experience with me just isn't my cup of tea anymore.
 

Fast LT1

New Member
May 24, 2010
2,017
Sedgwick County, KS
Okay, i've never had a ride along, but sometimes i have another officer ride in my car, i don't mind because all the equipment i need for the most part i carry on my person, everything else hits the trunk. But i did do a lot, i mean a lot of ride alongs back when i was in high school, because we had to take an entrepreneurship class and i picked the police department cause i figured it be easy, but it actually made me want to become one. Also as mentioned above about kids, i wasn't one of those kids that wanted to go bust criminals, in fact my favorite things were actually car accidents, and domestics (don't ask me why). But that has since changed!


All in all, i think the positive aspects of ride alongs far out weight the negatives. If by having a ride along and you convince just 1 person to pursue a job as an LEO or other Criminal Justice jobs, i think that far outweighs the fact of being inconvenienced a night or two. But thats just my $0.02!
 

Ben E.

Member
May 21, 2010
2,417
Iowa, USA
EVModules said:
You seem all sensitive, acting like it's your property when it's actually belongs to the taxpayers!

Actually it's titled and registered to the City, not "John Q. Public". Sure, they paid for it but it doesn't actually belong to them. By your rationalle, should they have access to my uniforms, badges, and be able to shoot department ammunition? Should they be able to come and hang out inside the PD by themselves whenever they want, maybe use our RMS or NCIC terminal?


I wonder how well it work would our if the "taxpayers" tried to take a spin in "their" car? I can't remember the last time I had a "taxpayer" show up and want to make sure that "their" floormats were vacuumed and the windshield was free of snot-spots from those couple times you have a sudden sneeze and your hands are busy with something else. I've also never had one volunteer to fix any of the lights, clean puke off "their" back seat, rotate the tires or change the oil.


Oddly enough, I pay taxes also. So me and my fellow officers will pay for our own cars and equipment, everybody else can have the city plows, ambulances, and water trucks.


Listen, in the end anybody who wants to ride with me can come ride with me. It's a pain in the ass to move my shit, but I'll do it and be friendly about it. Except that cat-piss smelling reserve. He can't ride anymore.

Stendec said:
You're right. I'll take a rider, so that they can tell all the other taxpayers about the shaking that starts at about 75 mph, the constant burning smell, and how the headliner is tacked up with staples. I shouldn't be Bogarting all this fun.

Weird. Mine starts at 93.
 

Rofocowboy84

Member
May 20, 2010
1,161
Centre County, PA
Fast LT1 said:
Okay, i've never had a ride along, but sometimes i have another officer ride in my car, i don't mind because all the equipment i need for the most part i carry on my person, everything else hits the trunk. But i did do a lot, i mean a lot of ride alongs back when i was in high school, because we had to take an entrepreneurship class and i picked the police department cause i figured it be easy, but it actually made me want to become one. Also as mentioned above about kids, i wasn't one of those kids that wanted to go bust criminals, in fact my favorite things were actually car accidents, and domestics (don't ask me why). But that has since changed!

All in all, i think the positive aspects of ride alongs far out weight the negatives. If by having a ride along and you convince just 1 person to pursue a job as an LEO or other Criminal Justice jobs, i think that far outweighs the fact of being inconvenienced a night or two. But thats just my $0.02!


I thought you did security? :? :?
 

Fast LT1

New Member
May 24, 2010
2,017
Sedgwick County, KS
I do run a private security business but i was a reserve officer (volunteer)for a while and i just got on with a new department.
 

patrol530

Member
May 23, 2010
1,016
Central Florida
ISU_Cyclone said:
Well you just took away the point I wanted to make ;)


But from someone who HAS participated in a ride along (or 50), they are helpful to those interested and expose people to some of the realities of the job. So please don't deny someone an opportunity because it may be an inconvenience for 8 or less hours :)

I was an FTO for over 9 yrs., a great portion of that time my right front seat was occupied. I've earned my solitude.
 

patrol530

Member
May 23, 2010
1,016
Central Florida
EVModules said:
You seem all sensitive, acting like it's your property when it's actually belongs to the taxpayers!

Sure, it's the taxpayers vehicle, and I take it home with me every work day for the average 4 years, and 100K+ miles I keep it. As it isn't a pool car, running 24/7, it lasts much longer. As it's assigned to me, it gets cleaned on a daily basis and waxed frequently. I also ensure the maintenance appointments are kept. All on "my" time, which is forbidden by policy, however I don't mind, as it's my office, that I occupy for 86 hours every pay period. The care I take with the taxpayers property is reflected in it's longevity of service. Fortunately, riders here are rare, and I've got enough senority to deflect most of those.
 

Bonanno

Member
May 21, 2010
535
Neptune, NJ
When I was in High School as a Student of a County Vocation Law Enforcement Program I got the opportunity to do a 6 month internship. I was lucky and got on with a Dept that stresses the importance of interns doing ride-alongs, of the 6 months I did (Fri only) I only was in headquarters once with it being in dispatch. All the other times I was riding shotgun in the patrol cars. They would shuffle me around and I got to know basically everyone in the patrol division for the 2 shifts I worked. The program was technically only supposed to be from 11:30am-2:30pm, but because I live in the town the PD covered, was an EMT/FF in the town and knew a lot of the guys and was well liked they got the OK for me to ride until 11pm. The dept is one of the most diverse and busy PD's in the county and has a large gang population and gets a good amount of violent crime and lots of CDS arrests. I remember one day I helped process prisoners from a raid from several Federal, State, and County agencies for drugs, weapons, and gangs. Good and bad part was I was required to wear my vocational "uniform" which consisted of khakis and a Blue polo labeled Monmouth County Voc. Law Enforcement Cadet with an embroidered badge on it. I also wore my patrol coat from explorers which had no markings or patches, just a plain navy patrol coat and a pair of patrol boots. I did this mainly so I wouldn't stick out as much and was approved to do such by shift supervisors for that reason. I helped with basically every regard I could, I did most of the first aid since I'm an EMT, ran plates on the MDT so the officer could focus on driving, and assisted with gathering info and basically worked as an extra officer sometimes. A few times they had me cross the boundary of what I was technically allowed to do, but if I didn't the officer I was with would have gotten hurt and/or the situation would have escalated. It was because of this internship that really drew me into Law Enforcement to become my career.


The PD that I work at does not have riders that often. They get a good amount of interns but they are utilized to updated records and do filing . Only occasionally do they let the interns ride. I know if I was working and the intern was also I'd probably ask the OIC to ok it that I could take them along, but I really don't know if they would allow it. I work mostly nights tho, when the interns work days, so it probably wouldn't happen. I know as being a former intern and police explorer that it is a very enriching opportunity that should be taken advantage of when given the chance.
 

Station 3

Member
May 21, 2010
3,395
Edinburg Texas
It kinda does suck to move all my sh*t to the back of the Tahoe when i have a rider. Plus i "Actually" have to work when i have a rider since all they want to friken do is traffic stops all frekin night. I usually like to patrol for like 5 hours then just park somewhere and pretend im doing radar or something for the rest of the shift :lol:
 

DLuccia

Member
May 21, 2010
675
Greater Waterbury CT
im not a cop im a firefighter I dont mind doing ride alongs for our explorers ,dept members family members,girl/boy friends


aslong as the chief clears them but we dont allow any one off the street to hop on a piece and go on a call.


if its something like a parade or function then they are ok every year we let santa and mrs clause ride on the ladder and they are non fd members
 

Stendec

Member
May 21, 2010
816
Station 3 said:
It kinda does suck to move all my sh*t to the back of the Tahoe when i have a rider. Plus i "Actually" have to work when i have a rider since all they want to friken do is traffic stops all frekin night. I usually like to patrol for like 5 hours then just park somewhere and pretend im doing radar or something for the rest of the shift :lol:

Um, something like that. Yeah, they want to see a traffic stop, but that couple hours of doing an inventory, processing paperwork, confirming warrants and booking a prisoner or two seems to get really dull for them really fast.


"Yes, I have to count the change in the cupholder, and no, I'm not going to cut the car into pieces looking for dope with an airhammer because they did it on COPS."
 

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