Official Location based warning law discussion thread

foxtrot5

Gold Supporter
911signalusa said:
We created an interactive guide to help drivers in many occupations locate their emergency vehicle light state statutes. Feel free to browse the guide here:

State Statutes Regarding Emergency Lights | 911 Signal USA
South Carolina is wrong.

SECTION 56-5-4700. Audible signal devices and signal lamps for authorized emergency vehicles, school buses and police vehicles; restrictions on use; effect of use.


© All police vehicles when used as authorized emergency vehicles must be equipped with oscillating, rotating, or flashing blue lights. In addition to the blue lights, the police vehicle may, but need not be equipped with alternately flashing red lights as herein specified, and may, but need not be equipped with oscillating, rotating, or flashing red lights, white lights, or both, in combination with the required blue lights. The authorized emergency police vehicle lights described herein must be visible for a distance of five hundred feet in all directions in normal sunlight. It shall be unlawful for any person to possess or display on any vehicle any blue light that is visible from outside the vehicle except one used primarily for law enforcement purposes.
your site says they must use red...
 

Skip Goulet

Passed Away
Miller88 said:
Here is clarification regarding lights on POVs in Oklahoma.

http://www.osfa.info/print_sub_article.cfm?subhomeID=4802&tophomeID=258898


Basically the answer is no. However Sheriffs can authorize POV's for law enforcement use.
With it seeming from what I just read that POVs aren't allowed emergency equipment in OK, I would be curious to know just how strictly that law is enforced. I've heard for years about POVs in OK being emergency equipped, and I've seen volunteers running 'hot' on a couple of trips I've made up that way.
 

chief1562

Silver Supporter
Sounds like a good idea. But needs alot more research to be usefull.
 

JCLG316

Member
Issues with Pennsylvania as well.


(2) Red lights. A vehicle may display red lights as follows:


(i) Under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571 (relating to visual and audible signals on emergency vehicles), an emergency vehicle, as defined in 75 Pa.C.S. § 102 (relating to definitions), shall be equipped with one or more flashing or revolving red lights.


(ii) Under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571, Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission vehicles used for the enforcement of 66 Pa.C.S. Chapters 23 and 25 (relating to common carriers; and contract carrier by motor vehicle and broker) may be equipped with flashing or revolving red lights. Fire Apparatus and Ambulances.


(3) Blue lights. Under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4572(a) (relating to visual signals on authorized vehicles), ambulance personnel, owners and handlers of dogs used in tracking humans, and volunteer firefighters may each equip one personal vehicle with no more than two flashing or revolving blue lights or one light-bar assembly containing no more than two blue lights. Only blue lights may be used on the light-bar assembly. See Figure 3.1.


(4) Combination red-and-blue lights. Under 75 Pa.C.S. § 4571( B) , police, sheriff, coroner, medical examiner or fire police vehicles may be equipped with flashing or revolving blue lights in addition to red lights—combination red-and-blue lights. The privately-owned vehicles of a police chief, assistant police chief, fire police captain and fire police lieutenant shall be equipped under paragraph (2).


CHAPTER 45. OTHER REQUIRED EQUIPMENT


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


SUBCHAPTER D -- EQUIPMENT OF AUTHORIZED AND EMERGENCY VEHICLES


§ 4571. Visual and audible signals on emergency vehicles.


§ 4572. Visual signals on authorized vehicles.


§ 4573. Identification of certain vehicles.


§4571. Visual and audible signals on emergency vehicles.


(a) General rule.--Every emergency vehicle shall be equipped with one or more revolving or flashing red lights and an audible warning system. Spotlights with adjustable sockets may be attached to or mounted on emergency vehicles.


( B) Police, sheriff, fire and coroner or medical examiner vehicles.--


Police, sheriff, coroner, medical examiner or fire police vehicles may in addition to the requirements of subsection (a) be equipped with revolving or flashing blue lights. The combination of red and blue lights may be used only on police, sheriff, coroner, medical examiner or fire police vehicles.


Unmarked police and sheriff vehicles, used as emergency vehicles and equipped with audible warning systems, may be equipped with the lights described in this section.


Police, sheriff and fire vehicles may be equipped with a mounted rack containing one or more emergency warning lights or side mounted floodlights or alley lights or all such lights.


© Game Commission vehicles.--(Repealed).


(c.1) Public Utility Commission vehicles.--Vehicles owned or operated by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and used in the enforcement of 66 Pa.C.S. Chs. 23 (relating to common carriers) and 25 (relating to contract carrier by motor vehicle and broker) may be equipped with revolving or flashing red lights in accordance with subsection (a).


(d) Vehicles prohibited from using signals.--Except as otherwise specifically provided in this part, no vehicle other than an emergency vehicle may be equipped with revolving or flashing lights or audible warning systems identical or similar to those specified in subsections (a) and ( B) .


(e) Authorized period of use.--The lights and warning systems specified by this section may be used only during an emergency or in the interest of public safety and by police officers, sheriffs and deputy sheriffs in enforcement of the law. An ambulance which is transporting a patient may use either the lights or the audible warning system, or both, as determined by the driver of the ambulance.


(f) Conformity with department regulations.--All equipment authorized or required by this section shall conform to department regulations.


§4572. Visual signals on authorized vehicles.


(a) Flashing or revolving blue lights.--Ambulance personnel, volunteer firefighters and owners and handlers of dogs used in tracking humans may each equip one motor vehicle with no more than two flashing or revolving blue lights.


In order to be eligible to display lights on their vehicles under this subsection, the names of the ambulance personnel and volunteer firefighters shall be submitted to the nearest station of the Pennsylvania State Police on a list signed by the chief of the ambulance or fire department or company and each dog owner and handler shall register at the nearest Pennsylvania State Police station.


The manner in which the lights are displayed and their intensity shall be determined by regulation of the department.


The lights shall be operable by the driver from inside the vehicle.


The lights may be used only while en route to or at the scene of a fire or emergency call.


The lights shall be removed from the vehicle within ten days of receipt of notice from the chief of the ambulance or fire department or company to remove the lights upon termination of the person's status as an active volunteer firefighter or ambulance person or upon termination of the person's active status as a dog owner or handler, or when the vehicle is no longer used in connection with the person's duties as a volunteer firefighter or ambulance person or dog owner or handler.


This subsection does not relieve the driver from the duty to drive with due regard for the safety of all persons nor exempt the driver from complying with all provisions of this title.


( B) Flashing or revolving yellow lights.--Vehicles authorized pursuant to the provisions of section 6107 (relating to designation of authorized vehicles by department) may be equipped with no more than two flashing or revolving yellow lights. The manner in which the light shall be displayed and the intensity shall be determined by regulation of the department.


© Vehicles prohibited from using lights.--No vehicle other than a duly authorized vehicle may be equipped with lights identical or similar to those specified in subsections (a) and ( B) .


§4573. Identification of certain vehicles.


Any truck which is used commercially to tow other motor vehicles shall have the name of the business, or person, operating such truck displayed on signs on both sides of such truck.
 

strobecrazy

Senior Member
911signalusa said:
We created an interactive guide to help drivers in many occupations locate their emergency vehicle light state statutes. Feel free to browse the guide here:

State Statutes Regarding Emergency Lights | 911 Signal USA
"Towing and Wrecker Vehicles May Use Yellow/Amber, White, Red, and Blue Lights


Under this same statue, tow trucks and wrecker trucks may also use yellow/amber, white, red, and blue lights on their work vehicles. However, unlike emergency vehicles such as police, ambulance, and fire trucks, tow trucks must obey all traffic laws."


Tow trucks in Georgia aren't allowed blue lights. They are allowed amber & white with state issued permit.
 

NJ_EMT

Junior Member
Hi guys,


Not sure if anyone has a legit answer to this ,but I figured it won't hurt to ask around. Also, I will ask my Chief about this. I'm just looking for anyone who has done or has any information on this. With that said, I currently withhold a valid Blue light permit and am currently seeking to install "RED" taillight hideaways behind a red lens in my tail light. Would this be illegal ? I'm kinda going back and forth about it since it's kind of a gray area. NJ law never says you can't poses rear facing red lights and I've seen a few people do it. What are your opinions on this ? Have any of you installed red lights to the rear of your vehicle ?
 

foxtrot5

Gold Supporter
NJ_EMT said:
Hi guys,

Not sure if anyone has a legit answer to this ,but I figured it won't hurt to ask around. Also, I will ask my Chief about this. I'm just looking for anyone who has done or has any information on this. With that said, I currently withhold a valid Blue light permit and am currently seeking to install "RED" taillight hideaways behind a red lens in my tail light. Would this be illegal ? I'm kinda going back and forth about it since it's kind of a gray area. NJ law never says you can't poses rear facing red lights and I've seen a few people do it. What are your opinions on this ? Have any of you installed red lights to the rear of your vehicle ?
Technically, the law says:

NJ Title 39 said:
39:3-54.9 Specifications.

3.Emergency warning lights shall be removable or permanently attached, of the flashing or revolving type, equipped with a blue lens and controlled by a switch installed inside the vehicle or shall be blue of the light bar type, in accordance with the specifications prescribed by the chief administrator.


L.1977,c.223,s.3; amended 1979, c.71, s.2; 2005, c.218, s.2.


39:3-54.10 Placement of motor vehicle, types of lights.


4.No more than two emergency warning lights shall be installed on a vehicle. If one light is used it shall be installed in the center of the roof of the car, or on the front of the vehicle so that the top of the emergency warning light is no higher than the top of the vehicle's headlights, or in the center of the dashboard. It may be a low profile light bar of the strobe, halogen or incandescent type, or a combination thereof. If two lights are used they may be placed on the windshield columns on each side of the vehicle where spotlights are normally mounted, or on either side of the roof at the front of the vehicle directly back of the top of the windshield. Under no circumstances may one light be placed on the roof and one on the windshield column in the spotlight position. Light elements shall be shielded from direct sight or view of the driver.


L.1977,c.223,s.4; amended 1979, c.71, s.3; 2005, c.218, s.3.


39:3-54.15 Warning lights, sirens on vehicle of volunteer fire, first aid or rescue squad chiefs or officers.


1.A current chief or first assistant chief of a volunteer fire company, or chief officer of a first aid or rescue squad, recognized by and rendering service in any municipality may mount and operate on a motor vehicle owned by him and registered in his name a red emergency warning light or lights, a siren, or both, as prescribed in P.L.1985, c.171 (C.39:3-54.15 et seq.). The size and type of lights and siren, and the location of their controls, shall be determined by the Chief Administrator of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission.


L.1985,c.171,s.1; amended 2005, c.218, s.7.


39:3-54.16. Placement of lights


All red emergency lights shall be mounted on the exterior of the motor vehicle. No more than two red emergency warning lights shall be installed on a vehicle. If one light is used it shall be installed in the center of the roof of the vehicle, or on the left windshield column in a position where a spotlight is normally located. If two lights are used they may be placed on the windshield columns on each side of the vehicle where spotlights are normally mounted, or on either side of the roof at the front of the vehicle directly back of the top of the windshield. Under no circumstances may one light be placed on the roof and one on a windshield column in the spotlight position. They shall be operated only while the vehicle is being used by the registered owner chief or first assistant chief in answering a fire or emergency call.


L. 1985, c. 171, s. 2, eff. May 31, 1985.


39:3-54.17. Siren mounting, operation


All sirens shall be mounted under the hood of the motor vehicle and shall be operated only while the vehicle is being used by the registered owner chief or first assistant chief in answering a fire or emergency call.


L. 1985, c. 171, s. 3, eff. May 31, 1985.
To me, it seems VERY specific as to what you can an can not do with a "blue light permit" but I know in certain areas of NJ volunteers get away with murder while in other areas, they are held to very strict standards. Being a former Bergen County resident, I can tell you that I saw plenty of POVs with lights well above and beyond what is allowed by law. Sometimes they were hassled about it, sometimes they were not. It would seem that, by law, you can not have anything mounted in the rear of the vehicle... however if you go by the exact letter of the law you can't use any LED products either. I'd recommend getting together with a bunch of the other NJ members on here (and also passing the word around to other departments) and write you reps and ask for a more comprehensive and up-to-date light law!
 

NJ_EMT

Junior Member
NJ_EMT said:
Hi guys,

Not sure if anyone has a legit answer to this ,but I figured it won't hurt to ask around. Also, I will ask my Chief about this. I'm just looking for anyone who has done or has any information on this. With that said, I currently withhold a valid Blue light permit and am currently seeking to install "RED" taillight hideaways behind a red lens in my tail light. Would this be illegal ? I'm kinda going back and forth about it since it's kind of a gray area. NJ law never says you can't poses rear facing red lights and I've seen a few people do it. What are your opinions on this ? Have any of you installed red lights to the rear of your vehicle ?


foxtrot5 said:
Technically, the law says:



To me, it seems VERY specific as to what you can an can not do with a "blue light permit" but I know in certain areas of NJ volunteers get away with murder while in other areas, they are held to very strict standards. Being a former Bergen County resident, I can tell you that I saw plenty of POVs with lights well above and beyond what is allowed by law. Sometimes they were hassled about it, sometimes they were not. It would seem that, by law, you can not have anything mounted in the rear of the vehicle... however if you go by the exact letter of the law you can't use any LED products either. I'd recommend getting together with a bunch of the other NJ members on here (and also passing the word around to other departments) and write you reps and ask for a more comprehensive and up-to-date light law!

Anyone else have any info on this ?
 

tcfd823

Silver Supporter
Anyone know anything about Arizona? the only thing I can find is that apparatus use red, LE is blue.. But nothing about volunteers. Wonder if it just varies from dept to dept...
 

Sutphen 606

Member
SECTION 56-5-170. Authorized emergency vehicles. [sC ST SEC 56-5-170]


(A) Authorized emergency vehicles for purposes of this section include the following:


(1) fire department vehicles;


(2) police vehicles;


(3) ambulances and rescue squad vehicles which are publicly owned;


(4) vehicles of coroners and deputy coroners of the forty-six counties as designated by the coroners;


(5) emergency vehicles designated by the fire department or the chief of police of a municipality;


(6) county government litter enforcement vehicles used by certified law enforcement Class 3 litter control officers;


(7) Department of Natural Resources vehicles, federal natural resources vehicles, and forestry commission vehicles when being used in the performance of law enforcement duties;


(8) public and private vehicles while transporting individuals actually engaged in emergency activities because one or more occupants belong to a fire department, volunteer fire department, police department, sheriff's office, authorized county government litter enforcement office, rescue squad, or volunteer rescue squad;


(9) county or municipal government jail or corrections vehicles used by certified jail or corrections officers, and emergency vehicles designated by the Director of the South Carolina Department of Corrections;


(10) vehicles designated by the Commissioner of the Department of Health and Environmental Control when being used in the performance of law enforcement or emergency response duties; and


(11) federal law enforcement, military, and emergency vehicles.


( B) Only authorized emergency vehicles and private security patrol vehicles regulated by the State Law Enforcement Division are allowed use or display of any blue lights or red lights. This includes light bars and smaller lights such as dash, deck, or visor lights. To "display" means to be seen, whether activated or not.


© A vehicle shall not display the word 'police' unless it is an authorized emergency vehicle for use only by sworn police or other officers who are approved and certified by the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy.


(D) The provisions of this section do not apply to automobile dealerships, to police equipment suppliers that sell, deliver, or equip police vehicles to or for a law enforcement agency, to vehicles owned solely as collector's items and used only for participation in club activities, exhibits, tours, parades, and similar uses, or to persons designated by an agency owning such a vehicle to drive the vehicle or drive an auxiliary vehicle transporting such a vehicle.


HISTORY: 1962 Code § 46-216; 1952 Code § 46-216; 1949 (46) 466; 1975 (59) 76; 1978 Act No. 461 § 1; 2004 Act No. 285, § 1.


SECTION 56-5-4970. Sirens, whistle or bell on authorized emergency vehicles. [sC ST SEC 56-5-4970]


Any authorized emergency vehicle may be equipped with a siren, whistle or bell capable of emitting sound audible under normal conditions from a distance of not less than five hundred feet and of a type approved by the Department of Public Safety, but such siren shall not be used except when such vehicle is operated in response to an emergency call or in the immediate pursuit of an actual or suspected violator of the law, in which latter event the driver of such vehicle shall sound such siren when necessary to warn pedestrians and other drivers of the approach thereof.


HISTORY: 1962 Code § 46-583; 1952 Code § 46-583; 1949 (46) 466.


SECTION 56-5-4830. Special restrictions on lamps; degree of intensity; red, blue and flashing lights. [sC ST SEC 56-5-4830]


Any lighted lamp or illuminating device upon a motor vehicle, other than head lamps, spot lamps, auxiliary lamps, flashing turn signals, emergency vehicle warning lamps, and school bus warning lamps, which project a beam of light of an intensity greater than three hundred candlepower shall be so directed that no part of the high intensity portion of the beam will strike the level of the roadway on which the vehicle stands at a distance of more than seventy-five feet from the vehicle.


A person shall not drive, move, or park any vehicle or equipment upon a highway with a lamp or device on it displaying a red or blue light visible from directly in front of the center of it. This section shall not apply to a vehicle upon which a red or blue light visible from the front is expressly authorized or required by this chapter.


Flashing lights are prohibited except on an authorized emergency vehicle, school bus, snow-removal equipment, or on any vehicle as a means of indicating a right or left turn or the presence of a vehicular traffic hazard requiring unusual care in approaching, overtaking, or passing.


HISTORY: 1962 Code § 46-553; 1952 Code § 46-553; 1949 (46) 466; 1957 (50) 112; 2003 Act No. 65, § 2.


OK that is the ABBREVIATED version. Simply put it is mass confusion. SO the jist of it is: In South Carolina Fire and EMS run RED and CLEAR. Law Enforcement runs BLUE (pretty strictly enforced). If you have lights they are at the discretion of you senior official i.e. fire chief. If you are allowed to run lights they MUST meet OSHA criteria (360 degrees of visible lighting and the siren has to be audible at a minnimum of 500 feet) There is no permit required to run lights. You must exercise DUE REGUARD when responding and are not authorized to violate traffic control devices. If your warning devices are illuminated and your vehicle is in motion (excluding backing) you have to have audible warning present (the siren has to be turned on). Law Enforcement are the only ones allowed to run lights only while the vehicle is in motion and that is only under specific circumstances.


Hope This Helps.


One Other Note. Some like to run a single trouble bubble on the dash. This is considered a "courtesy light" and DOES NOT afford the same Courtesies as afforded to individuals with lighting as defined above.
 
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Iowamedic2013

Suspended
kd0giz said:
IOWA

RED: For use by any EV, Tow trucks while responding to a police controlled incident, and strangely enough hearses in a procession.


BLUE: Can be used on any EV except that a vehicle used by law enforcement must have the blue the the passenger side ONLY, Also color for Volly FF's with signed permit from chief with no regulated amount of lighting.


White: Usable by EMS Vollys with signed permit from EMS coordinator of department, school bus strobe, mail vehicles (any color shade between white and amber), and any emergency vehicle.


Amber: Must be a vehicle that presents a hazard, mail vehicles (any color shade between white and amber), security as well


Green and purple so far have no official laws on the books. Some hospital security have started using green.

I have been unable to find anything that permits vol. FFs to run red to the rear, however some of the guys on vol. depts I am friends with run red to the rear only and I asked an installer friend of mine who also is a LEO and he has confirmed this is legal. I just can't find anything in the statute for it.
 

shues

Lifetime VIP Supporter
Brendan11 said:
Any postings about IL? I just read through here, and I didn't see anything, maybe I just missed it?

Thanks
Go back a few pages and read post number 93.
 

shues

Lifetime VIP Supporter
Brendan11 said:
Wow, not sure how I missed that, I must have skipped a page. Thanks for the help!
If you come across new or different information, please be sure to post it here.
 

CrownVic97

Veteran Member
Interesting fact I found out today:


I needed to find out if it was legal under North Dakota state laws if it was legal to run red/blue/clear lights and other warning equipment on private property. I am putting together a bunch of equipment proposals for a couple of mine rescue trucks and needed to make dang sure before equipment was purchased after the safety management picked what they want. I contacted NDHP HQ on Tuesday to talk to a state trooper about this and left a message with a trooper I was referred to. Today, I got a phone call that trooper and he listened as I explained my intentions and questions regarding this.


The trooper informed me that he found no restrictions in the law regarding emergency vehicle classification that private entities cannot use red/blue/clear lights on their vehicles. As long as the trucks remain on private property and not have anything activated on public roads (paved highway, county roads, etc), they are okay. Because these two trucks would be using haul roads and not public roads to respond to incidents, it works out. At any time the trucks had to be used on public roads, however, no lights or sirens are to be in operation. I will stress this in my proposals to have a small sign in the cab that explicitly states this regulation.


So, I guess if I have my own piece of land out in the prairie in the future, I can run reds and blues to my hearts content :haha: :crazy: :weird: !
 

kitn1mcc

Veteran Member
CrownVic97 said:
Interesting fact I found out today:

I needed to find out if it was legal under North Dakota state laws if it was legal to run red/blue/clear lights and other warning equipment on private property. I am putting together a bunch of equipment proposals for a couple of mine rescue trucks and needed to make dang sure before equipment was purchased after the safety management picked what they want. I contacted NDHP HQ on Tuesday to talk to a state trooper about this and left a message with a trooper I was referred to. Today, I got a phone call that trooper and he listened as I explained my intentions and questions regarding this.


The trooper informed me that he found no restrictions in the law regarding emergency vehicle classification that private entities cannot use red/blue/clear lights on their vehicles. As long as the trucks remain on private property and not have anything activated on public roads (paved highway, county roads, etc), they are okay. Because these two trucks would be using haul roads and not public roads to respond to incidents, it works out. At any time the trucks had to be used on public roads, however, no lights or sirens are to be in operation. I will stress this in my proposals to have a small sign in the cab that explicitly states this regulation.


So, I guess if I have my own piece of land out in the prairie in the future, I can run reds and blues to my hearts content :haha: :crazy: :weird: !

Here In Ct it is that way what ever you do on your own/private property is legal seeing how it is not on a state highway.
 

DalmatProd

Premium Member
But aren't vollies in CT allowed to run blues when responding on public roads?


Sorry for the mistype!
 
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CrownVic97

Veteran Member
DalmatProd said:
But are vollies allowed to run blues when responding on public roads?
In North Dakota, volly EMR, EMT, and FF POVs are classified as Class C emergency vehicles. They need to have a permit, though. Here's the law in regards to the use of a blue light:

39-10-03.2. Class C authorized emergency vehicles.


All class B specifications apply to class C authorized emergency vehicles except that a blue flashing light must be displayed in place of an amber light as provided in section 39-10-03.1.
And....here's the law in regards to the Class B authorized vehicle specs:

39-10-03.1. Class B authorized emergency vehicles.
1. The driver of a class B authorized emergency vehicle may:





a. Park or stand, irrespective of the provisions of this chapter.






b. Exceed the speed limit so long as the driver does not endanger life or property during the time of a local or national disaster.






c. Disregard regulations governing direction of movement or turning in specified directions.






2.
The exceptions herein granted to a class B authorized emergency vehicle apply only when the authorized emergency vehicle is displaying an amber light visible under normal atmospheric conditions for a distance of five hundred feet [152.4 meters] in any direction, and:





a. When it is necessary for the authorized emergency vehicle to use these exemptions for the immediate protection of life or property;






b. When an authorized emergency vehicle is stopped on a highway for the purpose of performing a duty as required of the driver; or






c. When traveling at a speed slower than the normal flow of traffic.
 
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DalmatProd

Premium Member
Thanks, Kit. I grew outside Boston and made numerous trips both to & through CT. And I occasionally would see a car racing by with a dept bracket or plate.
 

CodeMan

Member
Here's Florida's not part of the listed states, but useful info.. :)


316.2397 Certain lights prohibited; exceptions.—


(1) No person shall drive or move or cause to be moved any vehicle or equipment upon any highway within this state with any lamp or device thereon showing or displaying a red or blue light visible from directly in front thereof except for certain vehicles hereinafter provided.


(2) It is expressly prohibited for any vehicle or equipment, except police vehicles, to show or display blue lights. However, vehicles owned, operated, or leased by the Department of Corrections or any county correctional agency may show or display blue lights when responding to emergencies.


(3) Vehicles of the fire department and fire patrol, including vehicles of volunteer firefighters as permitted under s. 316.2398, vehicles of medical staff physicians or technicians of medical facilities licensed by the state as authorized under s. 316.2398, ambulances as authorized under this chapter, and buses and taxicabs as authorized under s. 316.2399 may show or display red lights. Vehicles of the fire department, fire patrol, police vehicles, and such ambulances and emergency vehicles of municipal and county departments, public service corporations operated by private corporations, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the Department of Environmental Protection, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Department of Corrections as are designated or authorized by their respective department or the chief of police of an incorporated city or any sheriff of any county may operate emergency lights and sirens in an emergency. Wreckers, mosquito control fog and spray vehicles, and emergency vehicles of governmental departments or public service corporations may show or display amber lights when in actual operation or when a hazard exists provided they are not used going to and from the scene of operation or hazard without specific authorization of a law enforcement officer or law enforcement agency. Wreckers must use amber rotating or flashing lights while performing recoveries and loading on the roadside day or night, and may use such lights while towing a vehicle on wheel lifts, slings, or under reach if the operator of the wrecker deems such lights necessary. A flatbed, car carrier, or rollback may not use amber rotating or flashing lights when hauling a vehicle on the bed unless it creates a hazard to other motorists because of protruding objects. Further, escort vehicles may show or display amber lights when in the actual process of escorting overdimensioned equipment, material, or buildings as authorized by law. Vehicles owned or leased by private security agencies may show or display green and amber lights, with either color being no greater than 50 percent of the lights displayed, while the security personnel are engaged in security duties on private or public property.


(4) Road or street maintenance equipment, road or street maintenance vehicles, road service vehicles, refuse collection vehicles, petroleum tankers, and mail carrier vehicles may show or display amber lights when in operation or a hazard exists.


(5) Road maintenance and construction equipment and vehicles may display flashing white lights or flashing white strobe lights when in operation and where a hazard exists. Additionally, school buses and vehicles that are used to transport farm workers may display flashing white strobe lights.


(6) All lighting equipment heretofore referred to shall meet all requirements as set forth in s. 316.241.


(7) Flashing lights are prohibited on vehicles except:


(a) As a means of indicating a right or left turn, to change lanes, or to indicate that the vehicle is lawfully stopped or disabled upon the highway;


( B)  When a motorist intermittently flashes his or her vehicle’s headlamps at an oncoming vehicle notwithstanding the motorist’s intent for doing so; and


© For the lamps authorized under subsections (1), (2), (3), (4), and (9), s. 316.2065, or s. 316.235(5) which may flash.


(8) Subsections (1) and (7) do not apply to police, fire, or authorized emergency vehicles while in the performance of their necessary duties.


(9) Flashing red lights may be used by emergency response vehicles of the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the Department of Environmental Protection, and the Department of Health when responding to an emergency in the line of duty.


(10) A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.
 

Rhinojoe

Member
ark_firefighter said:
Is there a thread already started on this ?

I'm looking for information on what volunteer firefighters can run on there POV's for the following states


PA, TN, NC & SC
I've never seen it addressed and am curious;


Anyone know how a Demo EV Vehicle, (with all inclusive emergency equipment installled), such as Whelen's vehicles, are not in violation of these States laws.


Thanks


RJ
 

unlisted

Gold Supporter
Rhinojoe said:
I've never seen it addressed and am curious;

Anyone know how a Demo EV Vehicle, (with all inclusive emergency equipment installled), such as Whelen's vehicles, are not in violation of these States laws.


Thanks


RJ
Simple. A business license and a current business involved in emergency equipment. Also having it clearly marked demo vehicle.


Oh and not playing with the lights on public streets.
 

Skip Goulet

Passed Away
unlisted said:
Simple. A business license and a current business involved in emergency equipment. Also having it clearly marked demo vehicle.

Oh and not playing with the lights on public streets.
I don't know if it's still in operation, but I saw one of Code 3's demo trucks in Odessa a few years ago. The back up of the truck had rollup windows on each side to show the lightbars, etc., that they were marketing at the time. I had a neat-looking Whelen car pass me on I20 a few months ago (I live just off the Interstate). The car was a bright red or orange and had Whelen graphics all over it and an LED bar on top. Judging from the looks of it, I would think it was a pace car for one of the big NASCAR tracks, and may have been returning from Texas Motor Speedway in Ft. Worth.
 

RyanZ71

Senior Member
brianmcfa said:
Here are Nebraska's light laws. Basically red is used on emergency vehicles and they may add white or blue lights. Tow trucks, mail, utilities, etc. get amber. School buses get a single white strobe. But the one that gets me is snow plows use amber/blue.
Not sure why that gets ya? Many states have snowplows use Amber and blue, just like here in Colorado. You just can't do blue/blue on snowplows. it works great!
 

Zapp Brannigan

Gold Supporter
Just to add a little more in regards to NYS, it mentions the lighting laws here, but in another thread, there is a question about electronic (or real) air horn usage.

http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/pdf/srgvat.pdf

Section 1104. Authorized emergency vehicles.


(a) The driver of an authorized emergency vehicle, when involved in an emergency operation, may exercise the privileges set forth in this section, but subject to the condition herein stated.
( B) The driver of an authorized emergency vehicle may:
1. Stop, stand or park irrespective of the provisions of this title;
2. Proceed past a steady red signal, a flashing red signal or a stop sign, but only after slowing down as may be necessary for safe operation;
3. Exceed the maximum speed limits so long as he does not endanger life or property;
4. Disregard regulations governing directions of movement or turning in specified directions.


© Except for an authorized emergency vehicle operated as a police vehicle, the exemptions herein granted to an authorized emergency vehicle shall apply only when audible signals are sounded from any said vehicle while in motion by bell, horn siren, electronic device or exhaust whistle as may be reasonably necessary, and when the vehicle is equipped with at least one lighted lamp so that from any direction, under normal atmospheric conditions from a distance of five hundred feet from such vehicle, at least one red light will be displayed  and visible.
 

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Administrator
Air horns on non-emergency vehicles while responding with blue lights:

Just to add a little more in regards to NYS, it mentions the lighting laws here, but in another thread, there is a question about electronic (or real) air horn usage.

http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/pdf/srgvat.pdf
I would argue that all audible signaling devices above the factory horn are really being prohibited.

Section 1104 in the New York Vehicle and Traffic Law gives exemptions for authorized emergency vehicles only when audible signals are sounded while in motion via bell, horn siren, electronic device or exhaust whistle.  Section 375, Equipment, states a gong or siren whistle shall not be used on any vehicle other than an authorized emergency vehicle.  A gong means audible signaling device, not just a big wok shaped dish on a string.  It's pretty clear that NY law is stating non-emergency vehicles cannot use audible signaling devices when responding.  A good cop that wants to will be able cite you and a good DA will win.  But let's be honest, that's not likely to happen.  What's much more likely is some person will plow into you, and it might not even be your fault.  A good car accident lawyer will easily prove you were using your car as an emergency vehicle if you use any type of after market audible device while responding. 
 
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foxtrot5

Gold Supporter
Thank you, thank you, thank you. I keep trying to explain to people that it's not always about compliance with the law for the sake of compliance with the law. Sure, most officers will "let something slide" but god forbid you get into a wreck while responding, you better believe that the other party's lawyer will go over your vehicle with a fine tooth comb!
 

nathanzx10r

Established Member
Oregon...Short version.

Blue = Law Enforcement, Fire Dept (state owned) only.

Red = Law Enforcement, Fire Dept, Fire Personnel (Paid or Vol) POV, if authorized by Fire Dept and local LE), Private Ambulance Company, Medical Examiner, Towing Company, ODOT Incident Response, Hazmat Company while stationary @ spill cleanup, Funeral Escorts (2 or 3 wheeled vehicles), Funeral lead vehicles (any type of vehicle), School or Worker Transport (Bus).

Clear = Clear lights must be forward facing, and are more or less used as an accent to the above colors. No rear facing clear (but not really enforced much either).

Amber = All of the above vehicle may have Amber lighting.  Amber only lighting = Construction, Road Side Assistance, Utility, Private Maintance Vehicles, USPS, ect.  Amber only is used for basically all non emergency lighting for professions that may have a need for warning lights, Both Public and Private.

Green = Fire Dept Incident Command Only.  Generally it is a small becon style light that is extended into the air above the Incident Command Post.

This is a basic break down of what colors are authorized for what profession in Oregon. 
 
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jacobm

Registered Member
Idaho:

Blue is for police use ONLY.

Red/clear can be used by fire fighters, volunteers included, EMS, volunteers included, ambulances, Search and Rescue while under direction of county sheriff, and wreckers. Must only be used when responding to an emergency, or on scene at an emergency. Wreckers must be actively recovering a vehicle. Under these circumstances, these vehicles are defined as emergency vehicles. ONLY these vehicles may use red lights visible from the front of the vehicle.

Amber may be used by anyone requiring extra care from other motorists. 

Sirens may be used by police and the above defined emergency vehicles as reasonably necessary.

Motorists must yield the right of way to all of the above, treating volunteer POVs as they would a state trooper or any other publicly owned emergency vehicle. 

Police and the above authorized emergency vehicles, while in response to an emergency, may: park irrespective of parking laws, proceed past red lights or stop signs only after slowing down as necessary to do so safely, exceed speed limits as long as life or property is not endangered, and disregard direction of traffic or turn directions. These allowances do not absolve the driver from duty to drive with regard to the safety of other road users, and the driver may be prosecuted for endangering others if any of his actions while responding do so.

School buses may also use red lights, as defined somewhere else.

Driving rules: http://www.legislature.idaho.gov/idstat/Title49/T49CH6SECT49-623.htm

Light colors and designation of emergency vehicles: http://www.legislature.idaho.gov/idstat/Title49/T49CH9SECT49-910A.htm

Siren/horn laws: http://www.legislature.idaho.gov/idstat/Title49/T49CH9SECT49-956.htm
 
Kentucky:


LE. Blue red and blue any combination of. Also some use clear and amber.


Fire/EMS/Rescue. Red. Some use amber and clear. Some dept policies require clear to be turned off on scene and atleast one amber activated during the day. Some EMs have authority to have red and blue. Green can also be used as on scene command.


Public safety. Amber. Or clear


Security. Amber. Green. Clear or combos. Some security services also have red and blue capability.


School buses. Can have red and amber alternating or flashing beacons can be installed in clear.


All emergency vehicles. Including POVs for vol fire and/or ems and rescue have to have sirens and have to continuously activate them when responding to emergencies with lights activated. The only exception to this is an ambulance transporting a patient that may be harmed by the siren activation. (I.e. Heart attacks.). Most dept policies here though require the continuous activation of a siren when lights are activated.


Now all that being said. There are exceptions to every rule. Ive seen fds Here have red and blue on command veh. Ive seen public safety vehicles here have green and red lights in the rear in combo with amber.


But for the most part. The above is the norm for Ky emergency vehicles.


Anyone wanting to reference the statutes feel free. lrc.ky.gov/krs/titles.htm. 189.910-189.950 are the statute sections. Too much to post my novel is long enough. :)
 
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nerdly_dood

Veteran Member
Kentucky:


Now all that being said. There are exceptions to every rule. Ive seen fds Here have red and blue on command veh. 
Virginia has pretty much the same rules. Once I saw a fire dept Suburban responding to an MVA with red and blue lights, I suspect it was a repurposed police car: http://www.policecarwebsite.net/pdcar4/pw.html so I wouldn't be surprised if they do that elsewhere without bothering to change the lights.
 

Skip Goulet

Passed Away
Texas laws are simple.   Red is the prescribed warning color.  Blue is allowed as an auxiliary color in conjunction with existing red on the vehicle.  Blue alone is not an emergency color.  I've mentioned in other threads that TXDPS has given a number of volunteers a hard time about running blue on their POVs along with existing red, claiming that blue is reserved for L.E. in Texas.  It is not!   A volunteer chief friend of mine had gotten some grief about this issue, so I suggested that he contact DPS-Austin, which he did. They replied to him that blue is not a reserved color and that is was fine for his men to use in their POVs so long a they had the required red as well.

For many years you only saw amber on TXDOT vehicles, but now they are using combinations of amber and blue.

Sirens have always been allowed on volunteer POVs in Texas.  Now they are required for the vollie to run "hot".   Lights alone were once allowed, but due to high numbers of MVAs, sirens are now required.
 

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