Old NYPD electronic sirens

tahoe603

New Member
I can't open the link in your post..IIRC, the NYPD Smartsiren (Premium Vision) was programmed with Wail, Yelp and Hi-Lo and the Priority tone was the horn ring Tap ll tone when the siren was in Yelp mode and or Wail
Thks a lot. And do you know how to transfer yelp and prty into the manual mode?(Which means the sound goes when pressed, and the sound stop when the button is lifted)
The siren is SS2000SB, in the version of NYPD.
 

em2436

Established Member
Just to clarify a little. NYPD has all 5 siren tones on their old ss2000's because the vision controller model of the ss2000 had all of those tones.

As for the way they have the 'manual' mode for yelp and priority. Thats simply a little trick the guys like to use by holding down the pa mic while the priority button is activated and it will stop any tones. Letting go plays the siren, acting like a manual button.
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
Just to clarify a little. NYPD has all 5 siren tones on their old ss2000's because the vision controller model of the ss2000 had all of those tones.

As for the way they have the 'manual' mode for yelp and priority. Thats simply a little trick the guys like to use by holding down the pa mic while the priority button is activated and it will stop any tones. Letting go plays the siren, acting like a manual button.
Yes, keying the PA mic PTT overrides any active siren tone so keying and releasing the PTT mimics manual use of the siren
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
I don't remember them either, maybe they selected a van chassis for '1 Truck' for it's shorter wheelbase to use in mid-town & lower Manhattan streets. I do remember those "low boy" pickup setups, I think they were on International Harvester platforms. This documentary was filmed in 1976, a year into the City's fiscal crisis, maybe the van REP was budgetary.
 
I know the department used a mix of REPs back then not including this. Ive seen pictures of the IHs and Dodges mostly and I've seen one picture of a mid 70s ford REP. I don't really know what was used when. If you look in the part with the barricaded EDP there is one of the IH REPs
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
That may have been specific to HWY RMP sirens or an oddball or even a personal touch by the officer(s) regularly assigned to the RMP because to the best of my memory the precinct RMP PA300s had instant peak & hold and no coast down.

Given the date of of incident in 5/90 I doubt that's actually a 1990 model year Caprice so if I'm right than that PA 300 pre-dates our fleet-wide application of them for the one model year they were standard between the SPs and the SmartSirens.
 
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NYSEMT20+

New Member
I currently have a Signal Stat Mark Seven Siren installed in my pov as a secondary siren.
Does anyone have a suggestion on how to fix the WAIL sound ?
 

NYSEMT20+

New Member
What’s wrong with it?
It's a looooong sounds and honestly sounds like a dying animal.
I was told a while ago that its a known issue and can be fixed with some re-soddering of the "motherboard" but never got instructions with what exactly needs to be done.
 

FCV96

Junior Member
Here's a question for you all. Of the Mark VII's that I've heard, some are generally higher pitched than the usual sound I expect from these. Were these variations from the factory, could age have something to do with it, or is there another explanation for this? Here's a comparison video to illustrate what I'm referring to - they were both routed through the same speaker (not simultaneously, of course :D).

 

classifieds869294

Established Member
Apparently there was a wide margin of acceptable range of sounds/pitch/etc. with these things. I learned that when I was trying to get a Stat VII to sound "right" with the help of MtnMan.

I'm not sure if your high pitched one came out of the factory like that or is a result of age, but the low pitch one sounds proper to me. Then again there's this video:

 

MtnMan

Senior Member
If you want to do some investigation, you could look for differences between the units in the resistor color codes and capacitor values. There may have been substitutions, either intentionally or out of expedience.

Even when new, resistors and caps have up to 10% variation, which can increase over time. Electrolytic capacitors are the most notoriously variable, but they would affect the wail / yelp rates, rather than the pitch.
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
In my NYPD experience spanning the final 10-12 years these sirens were in use I'd say the low pitch was the norm and that high pitch was the exception, possibly a component deviation/failure or maybe modded by/for the retail owner after it left Dept service.
I was friends with the manager and the chief tech at SP in Harlem and had them perform a few mods on my personally owned sirens so it's possible this was modified.
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
Apparently there was a wide margin of acceptable range of sounds/pitch/etc. with these things. I learned that when I was trying to get a Stat VII to sound "right" with the help of MtnMan.

I'm not sure if your high pitched one came out of the factory like that or is a result of age, but the low pitch one sounds proper to me. Then again there's this video:

This may have been one of the new generation digital SPs they re-designed to meet the NYPD spec that ultimately was rejected
 

Ghost1141

Registered Member
Here's a question for you all. Of the Mark VII's that I've heard, some are generally higher pitched than the usual sound I expect from these. Were these variations from the factory, could age have something to do with it, or is there another explanation for this? Here's a comparison video to illustrate what I'm referring to - they were both routed through the same speaker (not simultaneously, of course :D).

That's different....
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
The NYPD PA300s were not labeled "series" and they had the original paddle manual switch not the current toggle switch
 

Wailer

Veteran Member
Here's a question for you all. Of the Mark VII's that I've heard, some are generally higher pitched than the usual sound I expect from these. Were these variations from the factory, could age have something to do with it, or is there another explanation for this? Here's a comparison video to illustrate what I'm referring to - they were both routed through the same speaker (not simultaneously, of course :D).

I don't care for either one, but if I had to choose I'd say the low pitched version sounds better.

User deelony posted the definitive 1990-spec NYPD Caprice in another PA300 thread I have. Amazing find!

It's not the old style circuit with the slow rising fast falling wail tone.
 

classifieds869294

Established Member
It's not the old style circuit with the slow rising fast falling wail tone.
It's what the NYPD ran in 1990, none the less. Later in the video you can see that it's a black face siren box with "PA300" in white lettering.

The early very deep sounding models seem to be quite elusive, maybe mid-80's
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
It's what the NYPD ran in 1990, none the less. Later in the video you can see that it's a black face siren box with "PA300" in white lettering.

The early very deep sounding models seem to be quite elusive, maybe mid-80's
Because that's a HWY car not a precinct car I can't say with certainty it's a 1990- their fleet was known to differ from the rest of the JOB in any model year, it could be an older car with a stock/retail PA300 before the standardized 1990 PA300s.
 

classifieds869294

Established Member
Because that's a HWY car not a precinct car I can't say with certainty it's a 1990- their fleet was known to differ from the rest of the JOB in any model year, it could be an older car with a stock/retail PA300 before the standardized 1990 PA300s.
You would def know better than me. I do find it interesting that the siren in the old video sounds pretty much identical to the clip that mercury posted of his siren box. I realize that one is a much newer “PA300 Series” model, but Fed Sig could have configured it for the same tones.
 

CHIEFOPS

Senior Member
You would def know better than me. I do find it interesting that the siren in the old video sounds pretty much identical to the clip that mercury posted of his siren box. I realize that one is a much newer “PA300 Series” model, but Fed Sig could have configured it for the same tones.
I think the wail tone of our model year 1990 PA300s had a slightly longer windup before peaking and falling similar to FDNY. In any event they were not the "series" version and did not have the chrome toggle manual/air horn switch.
Assuming this somehow is an 'NYPD PA300' I can only guess it's a more recent version that was/is limited to certain vehicle types that don't do much emergency operation such as tow trucks, field command post vehicles or newly-merged traffic or school safety vehicles.
 

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