Cool, interesting, odd etc Fire/EMS vehicles -locked due to new section

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nerdly_dood

Veteran Member
I'm liking that IVECO van too.
 

chris_m

Junior Member
cook2890 said:
Chris_m, I love those fire truck pics! I personally like the tanker (tender) in the 3rd pic down, simply beautiful IMO!!!
Thank you :D Yea its a great bit of kit its the only one that particular service has it replaced one that was destroyed in a big fire at a fireworks factory that also claimed two fire fighters, I have some more of it is you want me to post them?

nerdly_dood said:
I'm liking that IVECO van too.
Its one of their mobile control vehicles I have some more photos of that one and their other one if you want me to post them?


I was a bit worried about posting too many photos didn't want to be seen as spamming....


Chris
 

cook2890

Member
Post those wonderful trucks my friend, always liked seeing the fire trucks from 'across the pond'!
 

Steve0625

Veteran Member



Can you tell us more about this vehicle? The body is obviously a roll-off, but I would like to know more about the purpose and the contents of it. It is an interesting concept.
 

chris_m

Junior Member
cook2890 said:
Post those wonderful trucks my friend, always liked seeing the fire trucks from 'across the pond'!
Will do them now :D

Steve0625 said:


Can you tell us more about this vehicle? The body is obviously a roll-off, but I would like to know more about the purpose and the contents of it. It is an interesting concept.
The truck is what is called a prime mover so can take any number of modular pods (will try and find some pics of the others) this one is a HVP (High Volume Pump) Its also a hose layer, its used when fighting a fire with a water source with low pressure or where water is scarce and they have to use a river/lake for example they can pump water at the same pressure as a normal appliance can but though 30+ miles of hose, it can also be use to pump water away in the case of a large flood for example...


the other pods are:


IRU - Mass Decontamination Incident Response Unit (For a MCI where lots of people need decontaminating


DIM - Detection Identification and Monitoring unit (For the detection and monitoring of any chemicals/CBRN substances at an incident)


MDD - Mass Decontamination Disrobe unit (each carry twelve hundred disrobe kits which can be distributed to contaminated casualties and an MD4 decontamination structure which can be provided to the scene for use by the either the Fire Service or the Police.)


MDR - Mass Decontamination Re-robing unit contain 1,500 re-robe packs for use by decontaminated casualties and one MD4 decontamination shower.


USAR - Urban Search & Rescue unit (there are 5)


Module 1: extensive equipment cache provides for scene assessment, technical search, electricity generation, scene safety, lighting, safe working at height, timber cutting, and concrete cutting & drilling.


Module 2: Contains heavy cutting, heavy lifting, and confined space and rope access equipment for use in major transport-related incidents, especially those involving rail or aircraft.



Module 3: Module 1 support at structural collapse incidents and includes timber support, heavy breaking and breaching tools, heavy lifting and moving equipment, access platforms, and lighting.



Module 4: A drop-side unit which carries the logistics and servicing structure, and a Bobcat Toolcat 5600 4-wheel-drive multi-purpose vehicle which can be used for transporting equipment to an incident site, unloading modules and moving rubble to clear sites.



Module 5: A flat-bed unit containing 10 tons of pre-cut timber for shoring and cribbing unstable structures.



HVP - High Volume Pumps A pump module with a hydrosub, submersible pump and 1 kilometre of 150mm diameter hose and a hose module carrying a further 2 kilometres of the same hose. Both these modules carry a range of adapters, valves and ramps which can be used to configure a number of differing water supply or water removal scenarios.
 

chris_m

Junior Member
cook2890 here's some more of Sierra 12:


4448379803_84fb62e6c3_b_d.jpg


4449161646_c1c2f17225_b_d.jpg


4448387401_1f6a1f2bd1_b_d.jpg


4449171372_10cf0c74ed_b_d.jpg


4448397275_2372f44576_b_d.jpg


and nerdly_dood some of both of ESFRS's command and control vehicles:


4449232876_fb6b05b17e_b_d.jpg


4450571114_65fb77f990_b_d.jpg


4450572922_3331ac241e_b_d.jpg


4530773344_8b6e24df0e_b_d.jpg


4530777498_a4f83001c0_b_d.jpg


I have wanted to go out and get some more of these so I will at some point.. These photos were taken when I was still experimenting and also with my old camera which had a blemish on the lens..
 

chris_m

Junior Member
Oh and for those of you that like water carriers here are the two the next service (county) along uses:


the old:


5791752804_8832322c47_b.jpg


and the new:


5791200803_dfb634c56b_b.jpg


Both are still in service and the old one is currently the largest local authority owned (Local Authority's are the people that provide fire and rescue here in the UK) water carrier in the UK.


Both these photos are NOT mine and belong to this guy: Flickr: mab2311's Photostream
 

Steve0625

Veteran Member
chris_m said:
The truck is what is called a prime mover so can take any number of modular pods....
Thank you so much! I am very impressed with this method of creating easy to transport and unload speciality units.


Does anyone know if this is being done here in the US? (Or are we so fixated on roll-offs being only for dumpsters that we'd never consider applying the technology to other uses?)
 

philyumpshus

Established Member
I've seen pictures of at least one FDNY Mack that had roll-off containers. I don't know what it was used for but the truck isn't very old (maybe a 2003?). Pierce had their unit that went in the back of a HD pickup; I think it had wildland, rescue, and other modules. I don't think it ever sold well, though.


Other than the FDNY rig, I haven't seen roll-offs in the US but the tech. rescue guys in Austria use them as well. They have containers for structural collapse, dump bodies, vacuum tanks with pumps, and a box for all the rigging that goes with their 60 ton crane.
 

TritonBoulder47

Site Guru
chris_m said:
Oh and for those of you that like water carriers here are the two the next service (county) along uses:

the old:


View attachment 12936


and the new:


View attachment 12937


Both are still in service and the old one is currently the largest local authority owned (Local Authority's are the people that provide fire and rescue here in the UK) water carrier in the UK.


Both these photos are NOT mine and belong to this guy: Flickr: mab2311's Photostream
I wonder how that first one drives... I've never seen a vehicle with 4 turning wheels in the front... Looks cool... :thumbsup:


That second one just leeks mean as hell to me...
 

philyumpshus

Established Member
TritonBoulder47 said:
I wonder how that first one drives... I've never seen a vehicle with 4 turning wheels in the front... Looks cool... :thumbsup:

That second one just leeks mean as hell to me...
A lot of European trucks use two steering axles, I think it's because they have tougher weight regulations for roadways. Almost all of the dump trucks and cement trucks I've seen over here have two steering axles.
 

TritonBoulder47

Site Guru
philyumpshus said:
A lot of European trucks use two steering axles, I think it's because they have tougher weight regulations for roadways. Almost all of the dump trucks and cement trucks I've seen over here have two steering axles.
Well I figured it was an across the pond thing... LoL I'd love to see something like that over here... LOL
 

chris_m

Junior Member
TritonBoulder47 said:
I wonder how that first one drives... I've never seen a vehicle with 4 turning wheels in the front... Looks cool... :thumbsup:

That second one just leeks mean as hell to me...



We have a lot of rigid trucks with rear steering..
 

rwo978

Site Regular
cory y said:
OK how many times are we gonna repost the same freaking pictures?!
no shit
 

cook2890

Member
Hey Chris_m, thanks!
 

stansdds

Veteran Member
cory y said:
OK how many times are we gonna repost the same freaking pictures?!
I've eliminated the quote from my post to reduce the redundant pictures.
 

FGS

Member
TritonBoulder47 said:
Well I figured it was an across the pond thing... LoL I'd love to see something like that over here... LOL
You asked for it. You got it. Took that picture in Boston. Autocar branded.

Autocar.JPG
 

Pimp

Veteran Member
As discussed before... Two of those "Q"s are just Q shaped covers to BP1/200 siren speakers.





Still overkill...
 
Any idea what the Green, Blue, Yellow, and Red lights are for on the back of the cab?

 
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JohnMarcson

JohnMarcson

Site Founder
Administrator
Bigredinstalls said:
Any idea what the Green, Blue, Yellow, and Red lights are for on the back of the cab?

Tank level.....


green full, red empty etc
 
JohnMarcson said:
Tank level.....

green full, red empty etc
It crossed my mind but i thought It could be some kind of on scene code light thingy.
 

TritonBoulder47

Site Guru
Bigredinstalls said:
Any idea what the Green, Blue, Yellow, and Red lights are for on the back of the cab?

Its to display what "line" is active/charged....
 

shues

Lifetime VIP Supporter
TritonBoulder47 said:
Its to display what "line" is active/charged....
That's an interesting concept! I've always seen these lights used to indicate remaining level in the water tank.
 

TritonBoulder47

Site Guru
The tank level is usually right on the pump panel and is usually only a small display... I'm fairly certain the large ones on the sides of the truck like this are used for identification of what line(s) are charged... The levers on the pump panel and first and last section of hose (if not the whole line) should corrospond with lights on the side...
 

Pimp

Veteran Member
That's the only time I've ever heard of those colored 4 tier lights being used for charged line ID and NOT water tank level indicators.





Interesting...
 

TritonBoulder47

Site Guru
Pimp said:
That's the only time I've ever heard of those colored 4 tier lights being used for charged line ID and NOT water tank level indicators.



Interesting...
Really...? I could be wrong... I've always thought there were for identification, since a water level guage that big is a little overkill... Especially since the pump operator should be at the pump, and most places have a ready water source (hydrants, tankers, etc.)
 

shues

Lifetime VIP Supporter
TritonBoulder47 said:
since a water level guage that big is a little overkill
I agree. I've seen a few trucks at FDIC with lights just like those that were specifically for tank water level. However, perhaps the specific purpose of those lights varies from region to region.
 
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